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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I know of a lady who runs 10k everyday...and I really think it is everyday ike part of her daily routine!

I would reeally like to do this...however, there are a few problems:

1. I can rarely drag myself out of bed to go running in the morning
2. If I started I think I would conk out after one week
3. When I'm not in the mood I need a serious push to get me to do something
4. I'm not currently running 70k a week anyway
etc. etc.

This is was I was thinking for next week:

Monday morning 6am 5 k
Tuesday morning off but I have karate 1830-2030 which makes it hard to get up the next morning I find....so...
Wednesday morning 5k with great effort to get out of bed
Thurs morn 5k
Fri morn off
Sat morn run with team - but they run at 5am!!! - is that not insanely early?!?!
Saturday or sunday afternoon - long run or trail or hike

This wek I am feelin pretty lethargic - split up with boyfreind few weeks ago and I think i has taken more out of me than I was expecting....perhaps...not my usual self !! :(
Anyway - anyone else running 10k everyday?!
 

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I am doing approx 5K every day except tuesdays (archery) and I find Wednesdays the hardest to get going again.

A drive like you are talking may be good to keep you focused for a while. Good luck.
 

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Jolewest said:
Hello!

I know of a lady who runs 10k everyday...and I really think it is everyday ike part of her daily routine!

I would reeally like to do this...however, there are a few problems:

1. I can rarely drag myself out of bed to go running in the morning
2. If I started I think I would conk out after one week
3. When I'm not in the mood I need a serious push to get me to do something
4. I'm not currently running 70k a week anyway
etc. etc.

This is was I was thinking for next week:

Monday morning 6am 5 k
Tuesday morning off but I have karate 1830-2030 which makes it hard to get up the next morning I find....so...
Wednesday morning 5k with great effort to get out of bed
Thurs morn 5k
Fri morn off
Sat morn run with team - but they run at 5am!!! - is that not insanely early?!?!
Saturday or sunday afternoon - long run or trail or hike

This wek I am feelin pretty lethargic - split up with boyfreind few weeks ago and I think i has taken more out of me than I was expecting....perhaps...not my usual self !! :(
Anyway - anyone else running 10k everyday?!
A lot depends on how high running is on your list of priorities. If you really want to run 10k every day, then this would place running pretty high up there in the list, and obviously this would be at the expense of other stuff in your life.
There are plenty of people around who are regularly clocking-up weekly distances of around, or well in excess of, 70k. But I imagine that many of these runners have little else going on in their lives to "get in the way" of their running time; or that they make substantial sacrifices to ensure that they get their running in.
You say that dragging yourself out of bed in the morning can be a problem? Well this is something that can be learned. Just like running. When you first try it it's not very easy. It's just a matter of getting your body used to it.
I do a pre-5am run on four mornings each week, and I know how hard getting out of bed can be; and how much harder it can be when I don't do it for a while. So nowadays I still tend to get up very early even when I'm injured and not running, just so that my body stays accustomed to being up at that time for when I start running again.

Doing 10k every day is obviously not something you can just jump into straight away. First of all you'd need to get used to running every day at a distance you can manage. Then slowly start lengthening the runs week by week.

A very basic plan could go something like...

1) Get used to doing 3 miles every day (Sorry, I can't work in"K's")
So that would be 7 x 3 miles
2) Then as each week goes by, add a mile to one or two of the runs.
Maybe 5 x 3 and 2 x 4
then... 3 x 3 and 4 x 4
leading to... 7 x 4
then 4's and 5's as above
all 5's
5's and 6's
eventually all 6's (10k)
(Now just wait for all the posts containing the word "rest" :confused: )

The key to this, and with all running in general, is patience and consistency.
If, as you say, you really want to be able to do 10k every day, you will find a way.
But it's got to be something you do really want; and you must really enjoy your running. If you end up making yourself miserable because you're forcing yourself to stick to a regime that you're not happy with, then there's just no point to it at all. You've got to be happy in what you do.

If you spent less time reading stuff like this, there'd be more time available for running! :eek:

Good luck!
 

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5am?! I don't even know what a clock looks like at 5am! :d

If your body can do it every day 10k shouldn't be too bad - even for slow people like me it would only be an hour out of your day.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the long post pedestrian! hmmm so I could train myself to get up early!! This would mean going to bed early too...which I'm quite good at!

If I start to get miserable I will change things! I am quite busy doing karate and yoga too these days.

Nat, know what you mean - rarely see a clock at that time!
 

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jolewest, i also don't really understand your post... you started your post with 4 reasons as to why you don't want to run everyday - so why is it that you feel that you need to run everyday? you say that you want to do it because your friend runs everyday - are you in some kind of competition with them ?...

normal people do not wake up at 5am everyday and train everyday forever... it is only pedestrian and your friend... if you try and do it then i think it will be a short term thing - most people get injured, bored, tired or have other commitments and practically everyone within will give up with this after 2 weeks... i think it would be much easier to increase the distance of you regular run (e.g. 6k instead of 5k) and keep having your rest days...
 

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Rest days are so important, how to people who run everyday keep free from injury or keep the motivation going?
 

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Revenged said:
...

... normal people do not wake up at 5am everyday and train everyday forever... it is only pedestrian and your friend... if you try and do it then i think it will be a short term thing - most people get injured, bored, tired or have other commitments and practically everyone within will give up with this after 2 weeks... i think it would be much easier to increase the distance of you regular run (e.g. 6k instead of 5k) and keep having your rest days...
So.... There are only two people in the world who get up early to train? Hmm... I think that you'll find that there are many, many more than that. View attachment 482



I am continually and repeatedly baffled by the apparent fear and reluctance that many people display when it comes to stringing consecutive training days together. Most people who run eventually want to see some progress and improvement in what they do... but then aren't prepared to challenge the limits of ability to which they have become comfortable with.
I just don't understand. :(
 

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My thinking on rest days is if you need one then you have pushed to the limit in the days leading to it. If you ease of on those days then there is no reason why you cannot run continually.

I run for half an hour a day and walk on incline for half an hour. That leaves 23 hours recovery time.
 

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My thinking on rest days is that quite often the requirement is more psychological than physical. It's easy to be "conned" into believing that a day-off is needed when you feel tired. I can recall countless occasions where I've had a run in which I can barely lift my legs; only for that run to be followed less than a day later by a run on which my feet hardly touch the ground.

The feeling of fatigue is normal, if not essential, for anyone who is seeking to improve their running in any way whatsoever. Fitness and improvement occur as a result of the body learning to deal with the increased workloads which the training regime places on it. But it's only through personal experience, and to some degree experimentation, that we are able to find out just what we're capable of ourselves regarding frequency, intensity, speed, distance etc...

Far too many people seem to be governed by limitations imposed on them by others. We seem to be wallowing in a mire of safety and over caution.
I've read more than one post on the Forum in which the poster has said that they want to, and feel capable of, running on a day which has been set aside as a rest day. And the majority of replies to these posts fall most fervently on the side of resting. The only limits that we, as runners, should concentrate on, are the ones we've yet to reach. There should be no fear involved in testing the boundaries.


In a schedule involving a run every day, it's easy to incorporate a rest period well in excess of 24 hours... For example, if a run is completed at 7am on Monday morning, and the next run is started at 7pm on the tuesday evening; there has been a rest period of 36 hours. So in theory it's possible to rest for a period approaching 48 hours, although this obviously isn't all that practical.
 

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pedestrian said:
So.... There are only two people in the world who get up early to train? Hmm... I think that you'll find that there are many, many more than that. View attachment 482
you joker... :p ;)

i think you misunderstood me... i was talking about setting unachievable targets and how only a small minority of people stick to them long term...

ask yourself this... what proportion of people who start waking up at 5am to run every morning stick to it long term (i.e. for a year)? (the answer will be a minisule minority)...

also pedestrian... i don't know why you say to me 'baffled by the apparent fear and reluctance that many people display when it comes to stringing consecutive training days together'... seriously though... you are telling the wrong guy... i don't do training scedules, complicated interval sessions, expensive running shoes, gait analysis and i certainly don't force myself to take days off if i don't want to !... i do run for days in a row and have done so with no bad effect...

but that wasn't my issue... i just didn't really think your advise was pitched to the right level... i'm not sure you looked at how good the OP was but i think she is pretty new and has already set herself quite an ambicious target to run next week... so for you to say to her that she should start running 3 miles 7 days a week implies that you think that her training schedules was not hard enough !... then by going on to say that how rest days aren't necessary implies that rest days are people just being lazy and not pushing themselves hard enough !!!...

there is a fine balance between pushing yourself and overtraining (as you know) and i think you have been running so long perhaps you've forgotten how hard it can be to start in the first year... you are in a different world to the original poster and, no offense, but i honestly don't think you can relate to someone new... i do not necessary disagree with your views on rest days but clearly someone who has run for ~30 years is at a very different level of training to someone who runs 10k in 2 hours... so i do not agree with your advice here... i thought this was a nice forum here... it should be about encouraging people to run and not making people guilty for taking rest days!...
 

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Revenged said:
you joker... :p ;)

(1)i think you misunderstood me... i was talking about setting unachievable targets and how only a small minority of people stick to them long term...

(2)ask yourself this... what proportion of people who start waking up at 5am to run every morning stick to it long term (i.e. for a year)? (the answer will be a minisule minority)...


(3)... i just didn't really think your advise was pitched to the right level... i'm not sure you looked at how good the OP was but i think she is pretty new and has already set herself quite an ambicious target to run next week... so for you to say to her that she should start running 3 miles 7 days a week implies that you think that her training schedules was not hard enough !... then by going on to say that how rest days aren't necessary implies that rest days are people just being lazy and not pushing themselves hard enough !!!...

(4)so i do not agree with your advice here... i thought this was a nice forum here... it should be about encouraging people to run and not making people guilty for taking rest days!...
Revenged, I'm sorry that my well-meaning advice has provoked what appears to be such an angry response. Maybe the misunderstandings are travelling in both directions, though?

(1)I set out in an attempt to show how what appear to be "unachievable targets" can be brought a lot nearer; and how often such targets are actually easier to reach than they seem.

(2)The 5am starts? There was never any question of this being done every day. I certainly wouldn't do it. I currently only have 4 of these early starts in my running week. I incorporate these as a means of running twice a day on those days. But it can be useful to be able to get a run in at this time of day if time is'nt available later on.

(3) I seem to remember Jolewest having run a marathon, and there was also mention of a 13k uphill race. Not really that much of a beginner then.
The original thread was a request for advice regarding running 10k every day. And as 5k appears to be a distance that Jolewest can presently cover easily, I thought that maybe this was a reasonable distance to aim for over each of the 7 days. I wasn't implying that the existing schedule wasn't hard enough. I was merely suggesting an approach to maybe achieving the intended goal.

(4) There was never any intention to make people feel guilty for taking rest days (and I'm sure that most people don't feel that way anyway). But I still maintain that a great many people are capable of resting less and running more.

Again, I apologise if you found the content of my posts to be in any way malicious. But there was a genuine intent to answer the original enquiry, and I don't believe that the advice I offered was as ill-aimed as has been made out.
 

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Revenged said:
ok, sorry...

There's really no need for you to be sorry, Revenged. Hope you can still enjoy the Forum.
I freely admit that I can find it difficult to pitch advice to beginners; and more often than not I avoid doing so. When I do "chip-in" it is with the honest intention of being creative and positive.

(*oh dear, poor old Jolewest's probably thinking she's started WW3 here*)

It's OK JW, you can come out again now. Everyone's friends (I hope) really. :d
 

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Hi there, just read your post.

I'll tell you my story: in 2008 I would only dream to finish 10k without making pauses, by now I actually run 10k everyday.

I don't like to run too early on the morning, it's too cold, I prefer the 9 am sun that gives me more energy. But when I have to work, then I have to run early.

I started running 2k every day, then 5k on 2009, which was a hugh accomplishment, and now 10. The thing that was really radical was the diet. I started watching my diet seriously, and the more weight I losed, the faster I run, more calories burned, and then again more weight loose.

I miss chocolate bars a lot. A lot. But the feeling I have when I run is actually better than chocolates.

Thanks and good luck
 

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A girl I worked with runs for an hour every single morning, and then 1.5 - 2 hours if it's the weekend. I think it's something to do with her army training. She has very good endurance and seems to be able to run forever at a plod. However she never gets faster, posting roughly the same half marathon times for the last 4 years now (she is mid 20s).

Much better to vary your training if you want to get faster. Have some harder sessions with rest days to see more improvement. Contrasting the above lady to myself, my first 6 months of running were spent with 2-3 sessions per week due to time constraints, but I made sure all were quality and I made a lot of progress, posting a half marathon time around 8 minutes faster than aforementioned lady... (although I'm sure she could have carried on and completed 20 miles, whereas I could've gone no further... but she professes to have 'only one speed)

ramble ramble etc
 

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Aargh! I post about once a day now and I've wasted it on a 2 year old thread... I blame Ccuesta!
 
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