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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve gotten into a really good groove this year, shedding 20 pounds and quickly getting up to an average of 28-32 miles per week.

I’ve done half a dozen longer runs, a few of which have been 10 miles. They were tough but I felt I had a mile or two left in the tank.

At the moment a typical week is 5,4,rest,10,4,4,3. I’m still a good 10 pounds over weight so what would be a wise weekly plan to get my 30 miles? Should I try to just do 3 or 4 longer runs? Is one rest day too little? I do feel a bit fatigued but the weight is kinda falling off me which spurs me on to go out most days.
 

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My current training is targeted to lose weight and get some base miles in before building up to marathon training later in the year.
A typical week would look like this:

Mon. Easy paced 5 miles.
Tue. 2 miles easy, 5 X 400m fast, 2 miles easy.
Wed. Easy paced 3 miles.
Thu. 4 mile tempo run.
Fri. Rest day.
Sat. 1 mile easy, 4 miles fast, 1 mile easy.
Sun. 8 to 10 miles easy.

I also do a 1 hour Gym session every day.
This is more or less repeated for 3 weeks and on the 4th week I drop the Wed run for an extra rest day and drop the Sun mileage by 2 or 3 miles.
Then repeat the cycle.

Remember that the adaptation to the training load happens on the rest days and the easy runs should be easy to give you time to recover.

This works for me, but one size does not fit all, it may take a bit of experimentation to find what suits you best.
 

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The best fat burning runs are long and slow. Rather than target weight loss, you might consider targeting a weekly increase in the time you are on your feet on your long run. So if you are now doing a 10 mile run each week in say 65 minutes, then increase the time of your long run by 5 minutes each week. It's not the distance that matters so much as time on your feet. Increase each week to a 120 minute run. Go slow. Keep your heart rate down.
Also, I would rest two days a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cheers guys. At the moment I’m pretty slow so my 10 miler is coming in at 85mins.

During the last couple of weeks (and for the first time ever) I started to experience heel pain in one foot which I feel is the dreaded plantar. It was mild at first and eased off within a mile or two however today it was so uncomfortable for the first 2 miles I thought it best to just do 5 miles instead of a planned weekly 10.

Looking back at my stats I did try to up mileage marginally each week but perhaps the last 3 weeks where I have 3 tens and a couple of 8s is too much in addition to the daily dog running.

I don’t really know what to do - this time last year I went on a mad 8 weeks of doing dozens of 10-12 mile runs but the differnce was I was just running 3 or 4 times a week - not 6 days.

It’s so difficult not to run everyday!!!
 

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Its not easy or certain to advise anyone about physical activity like this without observing, so you will just have to take this as optional advice, if you wish.

Plantar is associated with calf and achilles zone. So my guess is that you are using your calves too much and not using your quads enough. My advice to all our runners is that they should 'run with their knees' and not with their feet. Sounds daft doesnt it - surely all running is with the feet?

How to run with your knees? Relax everything below the knee, at the start during and particularly towards the end of your run when some fatigue will be setting in. To relax, you have to think about relaxing and not using your calf or ankle at all.

Then, when you are running and your rear leg has completed the stance phase (ie you are about to bring it forward in the stride phase) focus on lifting your knee forward and up (You wull use your quads to do this). Keep everything below the knee completely relaxed and let you foot land without thinking about where it is landing. I can assure you it will be under your hip, just where you want it to be, without overstride. Repeat throughout your run. You will have to keep bringing your focus back to relaxing below the knee and using quads to lift the knee becuase your mind will wander.

Your aim is not to use your calf muscles or those around your ankle at all. Actually, even if you completely relax, you won't be able to avoid using them, but try not to by relaxing them. If you run with your knees you will find you develop a mid foot strike pattern. (It's likely you are currently a heel striker) The benefit is not just to reduce likelyhood of plantar, but to increase your stamina as you will bring underused quads into your power bank.

If you want to go faster, bring your knee forward faster and higher, dont use yoir calf or ankle.

Second idea for you, is to move to zero drop shoes. I happen to use Altra but I am sure there are others. Take it easy at first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I appreciate the post.

I’ve noticed in recent years I’m no longer a heel striker, maybe it’s getting older and slowing a little. I no longer overpronate either.

At the moment I’m probably over-training because I’m seeing such good results on the scales each week. It’s probably short-sighted but I feel if I can just keep up this dogged style of running most days for another 6 weeks or so then I can get back to quality training at a lower weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’ve got an appointment with a podiatrist tomorrow as the heel pain is not going away. It’s not impacting running yet, I’ve only have one run where it was too painful. It’s normally excruciating in the morning then eases off within an hour.

The main issue I have right now is general fatigue. It’s crazy to think I’ve lost a stone since I did my first 10 miler of the season but there I was today, having to run/walk a 9 miler because I just so felt exhausted.

I need to have 2 or 3 days off this week and eat well. It’s just so tempting to run everyday but I can see it’s counterproductive.
 

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Comment by a Physio "Overstriding running is when your foot lands too far out in front of your centre of mass when you run. This creates a braking force that you must overcome to propel yourself forward. It also encourages you to land hard on your heel with a straight knee. This increases impact which may increase your risk of injury". If overstriding is a cause, then the advice I gave in my first post on this thread will really help you.
 
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