Runners Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After years of frustration trying to build up milage and always ending up injured I finally went and had a biomechanical gait analysis done.
It transpires I am slightly bow legged, have very high arches and am a supinator (spelling?) not a good shock absorbing/running design.
The podiatrist recommended getting custom orthotics so I had my feet moulded in plaster of paris (messy business).
Couple of questions for anyone who has experience of orthotics
a. have they worked for you
b. Is £195 -the quoted price- reasonable?
c. The plaster cast was taken from my completely neutral (non-weight baring) foot is this normal?
Appreciate hearing anyone elses experiences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
I have custom orthotics because I do the opposite to you overpronate and it is normal to take the casts of your non-weight baring foot - who did you go and see in the end?

They have worked for me in the sense that they have stabilsed my knees and allowed me to increase my mileage but I also have to work on my core stability etc.

I was quoted around £450 by one podiatrist (that also included all my appointments as well as orthotics) so £195 seems reasonable by comparison are you being offered any kind of guarantee or any follow-up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi Edwina - in the end I went to a pod in Weymouth - Foot clinic she advertised on the Runners world Runners rescue so I judged she might know what she was talking about. I have to say it was a fascinating process looking at your foot and running gait on computer - then getting the full low down on your foot structure. I am "fearfully and wonderfully made" but not really ideal for running - bow legged and inflexible high arched feet - however great leg muscles (apparently!)
Undetered I am going for the orthotics and highly cushioned neutral shoes - then its positive mental attitude and lets see where we can take this running journey!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Don't worry Fishoutofwater I'm not really built for running - knock kneed and overpronating more than expected ( I have an arch). My left leg doesn't drive through normally either so I'm really prone to overuse injuries. Sore hamstrings today in my left leg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Look at the simple things first before buying into orthotics!


Do I need new shoes? is the cushioning Okay...have I got the right shoes?

Am I over training....have I increased my mileage by too much this week?

Your body naturally absorbs the shock created by movement. Changing or 'straightening up' can take away your body's ability to efficiently manage shock. I have three county and national runners who have tried orthotics only to stop using soon aftyerwards because of other injuries.

Most people are biomechanically unsound anyway..one leg longer than the other.. one knee points out more than the other etc. Some of our top athletes run and achieve success working around these issues. Steve Cram was one of the worst pronators I'd ever seen but a good pair of straight lasted shoes sorted this out and the rest is history.

Think about what will happen when you try to put the orthotic in your running shoe!
The orthotic will detract from what the shoe is naturally trying to achieve. You are also higher up because of the orthotics so your running style is prone to increased instability.

If you do buy orthotics, my advice would be to wear them in your every day shoes first and try running without them.

Look I'm not saying orthotics will not help you but try the simple things first and don't expect miracles!


Sherwood UKA coach
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Steady Edwina said:
I have custom orthotics because I do the opposite to you overpronate and it is normal to take the casts of your non-weight baring foot - who did you go and see in the end?

They have worked for me in the sense that they have stabilsed my knees and allowed me to increase my mileage but I also have to work on my core stability etc.

I was quoted around £450 by one podiatrist (that also included all my appointments as well as orthotics) so £195 seems reasonable by comparison are you being offered any kind of guarantee or any follow-up?

the more i see these quoted prices the more i think i should put my prices up...... But still £1800 was the worst price i have heard for a set of orthotics:eek: :eek:
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top