Runners Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I’m after some advice as I’ve had ongoing issues with my Achilles and more latterly my calf muscles (both legs have been effected). The reoccurring injuries has been a bit of an emotional rollercoaster and for the past ten years I’ve not ran and as a result I’ve gained quite a bit of weight.

in my teens and twenties I was a keen runner, running between 5-7 miles 3/4 a week and experienced no issues at all. The issues appear to have started after I gave birth to my daughter when I experienced pain in my severe pain in my Achilles. I would stop for a couple of months and then try again and I’d injure myself again. I’ve tried this numerous times, bought appropriate trainers (I’ve been told I over pronate) and then eventually started experiencing issues with my calf muscles. Having never enjoyed or been any good at any other sport I found the constant cycle of running/injury upsetting and eventually stopped.

I’ve had physio (nhs) over the years and been told a number of different things, such as Achilles tendinitis, issues with my hip and runners calf.

Recently in an attempt to lose weight I’ve started spinning which I hate with a passion. I have tried to do the 0-5k with colleagues at work and within two “runs” (literally less than 10 minutes of running) I’ve injured myself. The pain feels like tightness you’d get from cramping and in past experience this is usually followed by the muscle abruptly uncrampimg but being excruciatingly painful, to the extent that it hurts to walk or drive.

I’d love to start running again but the constant injury when I do is getting me down and it seems I’m injuring myself more quickly as i get older.

I’m not an experienced runner but loved it when I did and just wanted to see whether anyone had any advise.

many thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
Yeah, I suggest you start a programme of calf drops before taking up the running. If you have unusual shoes such as those with zero drop, then ditch them for the time being. If you are a forefoot lander then calf and achilles exercises will be especially important when resuming running after a long break.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
All good advice above.

Have you considered paying to go and see a sports physio, as they will have a good look at how your feet strike the floor, your gait, things like the alignment of your hips, as well as your calves, achiilies, ankles etc.

As mentioned above, your shoes could be part of the problem too and the sports physio will advise accordingly there too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hi Everyone,

I’m after some advice as I’ve had ongoing issues with my Achilles and more latterly my calf muscles (both legs have been effected). The reoccurring injuries has been a bit of an emotional rollercoaster and for the past ten years I’ve not ran and as a result I’ve gained quite a bit of weight.

in my teens and twenties I was a keen runner, running between 5-7 miles 3/4 a week and experienced no issues at all. The issues appear to have started after I gave birth to my daughter when I experienced pain in my severe pain in my Achilles. I would stop for a couple of months and then try again and I’d injure myself again. I’ve tried this numerous times, bought appropriate trainers (I’ve been told I over pronate) and then eventually started experiencing issues with my calf muscles. Having never enjoyed or been any good at any other sport I found the constant cycle of running/injury upsetting and eventually stopped.

I’ve had physio (nhs) over the years and been told a number of different things, such as Achilles tendinitis, issues with my hip and runners calf.

Recently in an attempt to lose weight I’ve started spinning which I hate with a passion. I have tried to do the 0-5k with colleagues at work and within two “runs” (literally less than 10 minutes of running) I’ve injured myself. The pain feels like tightness you’d get from cramping and in past experience this is usually followed by the muscle abruptly uncrampimg but being excruciatingly painful, to the extent that it hurts to walk or drive.

I’d love to start running again but the constant injury when I do is getting me down and it seems I’m injuring myself more quickly as i get older.

I’m not an experienced runner but loved it when I did and just wanted to see whether anyone had any advise.

many thanks in advance
Hi, quite often such issues can relate to changes in mechanics and frequently due to previous/historic injuries. For example, unresolved ankle inversion or eversion injuries can cause a wide range of issues at a later date and not just in the lower limbs and that fits extremely well with your experiences. It is possible to do a large proportion of the ankle rehabilitation at home and without assistance. That said, I would actually get some treatment too. Equally, tissues have to adapt to the demands that are placed on them and there are a wide range of variables affecting how well they adapt. I can post a link to some related articles I put together on these subjects if that would be of help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
All good advice above.

Have you considered paying to go and see a sports physio, as they will have a good look at how your feet strike the floor, your gait, things like the alignment of your hips, as well as your calves, achiilies, ankles etc.

As mentioned above, your shoes could be part of the problem too and the sports physio will advise accordingly there too.
Hey, thanks for the response. Yes I’ve gone to a sport physio and he’s said that it’s runner calf and has given me some exercises.I have my reservations, I believe that might be some underlying issues with my hip but I guess in the first instance I’ll do the exercises he’s suggested and see how I get on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi, quite often such issues can relate to changes in mechanics and frequently due to previous/historic injuries. For example, unresolved ankle inversion or eversion injuries can cause a wide range of issues at a later date and not just in the lower limbs and that fits extremely well with your experiences. It is possible to do a large proportion of the ankle rehabilitation at home and without assistance. That said, I would actually get some treatment too. Equally, tissues have to adapt to the demands that are placed on them and there are a wide range of variables affecting how well they adapt. I can post a link to some related articles I put together on these subjects if that would be of help?
yes please terry that’d be very helpful
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top