Runners Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,

I am fairly new to running but pleased with my times. I know I can run faster and I rarely feel overly tired, however, I can never push myself as i feel like my legs are filled with led.

Yesterday I done 10k in 44 ish minutes and when i stoped i was abaolutely fine breathing and if i had a different set of legs i could have done it again. My legs however felt like i have spent the last 44 minutes squatting...

i wondered if it was due to my diet but i have a clean well balanced diet. I eat a plant based diet.

please can anyone advise?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
That's just because you're new and you haven't done enough endurance training to adapt yet. It will get easier over time as you do more longer runs.

For the most part diet doesn't matter as long as you are getting enough of what your body needs. People do well at all distances on pretty much any kind of diet you can think of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for this. I appreciate the advice. I come from a rugby background so i worried that maybe my build didn't lend itself well to this sport! could you advise any kind of training in particular or just more long run trainig? usually i will do 2 5 k runs and 2 10k a week.

thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Thank you for this. I appreciate the advice. I come from a rugby background so i worried that maybe my build didn't lend itself well to this sport! could you advise any kind of training in particular or just more long run trainig? usually i will do 2 5 k runs and 2 10k a week.

thank you.
It's pretty common for people who come from other sports because they already have a decent aerobic system. It can be particularly bad for cyclists as they don't have the impact resistance in their legs so it's easy to get injured.

If you're not training for anything specific you could try increasing one of the 10K runs a little bit every couple of weeks. You don't have to go much over 10K to make 10K feel easy; maybe top out around 16km or possibly lower if you only care about running 10km. You will also need to have a recovery week every now and then where you knock the distance back.

When I'm doing base training I usually do 2 weeks at same distance, recovery week, then 2 weeks at longer distance, etc. For race specific training I usually increase every week for 2 or 3 weeks then recovery week. Experiment to find what works for you.

Alternatively, find a half marathon training plan and do that. The race at the end of it would be optional but they're fun so I'd suggest doing it anyway.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
4,202 Posts
The lactic acid will build up if you're running at a pace where your body cannot clear it up quickly enough, if you drop your pace your body will be able to keep pace with the lactic acid build up.
Try to find you threshold pace and run just below that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It's pretty common for people who come from other sports because they already have a decent aerobic system. It can be particularly bad for cyclists as they don't have the impact resistance in their legs so it's easy to get injured.

If you're not training for anything specific you could try increasing one of the 10K runs a little bit every couple of weeks. You don't have to go much over 10K to make 10K feel easy; maybe top out around 16km or possibly lower if you only care about running 10km. You will also need to have a recovery week every now and then where you knock the distance back.

When I'm doing base training I usually do 2 weeks at same distance, recovery week, then 2 weeks at longer distance, etc. For race specific training I usually increase every week for 2 or 3 weeks then recovery week. Experiment to find what works for you.

Alternatively, find a half marathon training plan and do that. The race at the end of it would be optional but they're fun so I'd suggest doing it anyway.
Great, thank you for that. There is a runninh club near by that I was going to try out but I know I prefer to run alone. I will give the Half marathon training a go. I am confident that I could run a half fairly hassle free as i've done the distance a few times but I want to get the tome down. It's frustrating as i know in terms of fitness i could run further or faster but my legs just do not like it. thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The lactic acid will build up if you're running at a pace where your body cannot clear it up quickly enough, if you drop your pace your body will be able to keep pace with the lactic acid build up.
Try to find you threshold pace and run just below that.
That's great advice! thank you. It's frustrating me loads because if this wasn't happening I know i could go further and faster but my legs will not have it. Thanks again for your advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Great, thank you for that. There is a runninh club near by that I was going to try out but I know I prefer to run alone. I will give the Half marathon training a go. I am confident that I could run a half fairly hassle free as i've done the distance a few times but I want to get the tome down. It's frustrating as i know in terms of fitness i could run further or faster but my legs just do not like it. thanks again
Joining the running club will make an immeasurably large difference to your running and will do so vastly quicker than you would be able to achieve on your own. I'd strongly suggest you put aside all your inhibitions and at least go and try it out. If you don't like it then no harm done.

Good luck, whatever you decide to do in the end :)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top