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Sorry if this has been covered before, but I have returned to running after many years, given up smoking, and have a small itch, that says I might have another go at running. I am managing about 4 runs a week, usually 3 or 5 miles each. I am 56, 12 st 4lb and 5' 9''tall.

Now here's the thing, and I know, yes, I am getting old, and need loose a bit of weight, but this body of mine is having a right moan at me, protesting that I should have the good grace to enjoy a glass of wine, and stop dreaming of getting fit again, and punishing it. I manage a few short runs a week, about 20 miles a week over the last 3 months, and want to increase that over time to sufficiant milage to run a respectable 10 miler ( I am a sub 3hr marathoner in my youth ).

I am getting there - here's the question - can I reasonably anticipate that some time in the not too distant future, that my body will stop aching so much, hips are the worst, but legs have days when they sulk as well. Does it get better? Or is it just old age creeping up on me, and I have to accept the pains that come with it.

Thanks
 

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I think if you take it steady and don't try to rush things you will be O/K.

I had 20 odd years out of the sport and only started running again in February last year, I am 56, 11st 2lb and 5' 9" and was a sub 3 hour marathoner back in the day. I am not quite so quick these days but find I am competitive within my age group.

Stick at it and set your self some short and long term goals and go for it.
The pains do ease after a while:d
 

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I am only 48 (love being able to say 'only' :d ) and never was a runner in my youth. I have always been involved in other sports tho' and the subject of the aging athlete has always been of interest to me.

My view is that there are two broad approaches:

1. Accept that your body is less capable than it was and concentrate on doing what is still comfortable for you.

2. Work out why your body is less able than it was 30 years ago and get to work returning it to it's former glory (as much as is possible).

I prefer to take the latter approach and studies show that to a great extent it is possible. At 56 (amongst other things) you've lost a lot of muscle, your posture and therefor form/biomechanics are probably poor. Tissue is less elastic and takes longer to recover. A switch to strength training, work on posture/biomechanics and a shift to higher intensity, lower mileage training will help you to turn the clock back allowing you to get closer to the way you used to run.

But to some people that's just a chore. In which case you look at the advantages to being older. Mainly I think that because you've lost fast twitch muscle fibers you now have a higher percentage of slow twitch fibers than you had in your youth. This means that whilst you might be slower you could well be better at very long runs.

Either way I think the answer is that at any age you will respond to training and can expect good results. The challenge is to stay injury free in the process. So no silly, gung-ho 'mind over matter' stuff and 100% attention to recovery.

Good luck!
 

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A few aches and pains are par for the course, not to mention the odd injury. Even elite athletes suffer from them but, unlike us mere mortals, they have coaches and physios to work on them before, during and after their work-outs.
Find your optimum training/racing weight to reduce pressure on hips and joints, and work on core fitness. Supplements like Glucosamine and cod liver oil could also help. Devise a suitable post-run stretching programme and maybe make use of a massage stick or foam roller.
I'm not sure whether aches and pains diminish in time, or whether we just get used to them but, so far as I'm concerned the benefits and advantages of running far outweigh the disadvantages.
Stick at it, and good luck with your return to running.
 
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