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Hi guys
I have been following the BUPA beginners 5k training programme and I'm on week 5. The guidelines for this week are that I should run for 7minutes and walk for 2 for three repeats. I decided not to check my time while running the last couple of session and found when I stopped to walk I had run between 11 and 13 minutes each time. I was able to turn and do the same on the way back (only total of two repeats though) Do you think I'm likely to do myself any damage with this? My running pace is (very) slow and I've felt fine after both sessions so I'd be keen to continue this way but obviously don't want any injuries.
Plus I've only got four years before the marathon in the next olympics:d
Advice will be gratefully received!
Thanks,
Michael
 

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If you feel comfortable then I wouldn't worry :)

The plan you're following is only a guideline so there's no harm in putting a little bit of extra work in provided it doesn't cause any niggles or serious aches...
 

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ive read in a few places that you should stick to training plans regardless of wether you feel you could carry on...
i think it was an artical in runners world that said "its better to feel that you could have carried on"
however i dont know if they were refering to marathon training...

personally at this point wouldnt worry too much about going over the recommend plan run/ walk schedual.. they are very broad to get people active.. and of course every body is different and everyone has different fitness levels to start with.

the trick is not to go too fast when you start to run... when i started i couldnt run for more than 15mins and i would be flat on my back... i went out bought a garmin forrunner 50 and the very next run managed to go for 40mins, mainly as i could see when i need to slow down again.

Good Luck with the training though
 

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take two people aged 30, who haven't run since school... one of them won't manage it to the end of the road, one could complete a half marathon with a hangover. When you first start running it's all about finding your feet and seeing what level you're at. Once you're settled into a training program that you feel suits you, it's worth sticking to the suggested speeds/distances to prevent injury, but as a newcomer the likelihood is you've just started off with a training program that's probably below your natural ability.
 
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