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Hi all, I'm a very keen runner and outdoor enthusiast. However, running has always been my main sport but i was in a snowboard accident in november where i bashed my left kneecap. There was a good bit of fluid and i found it very hard to bend the next day but things got worse, i got exercises from a physio who told me to do extended short groin stretches where someone pushed down on both my knees while i was in a sitting position. They were hard work and it ended up that i seemed to really damage my patellar tendon which still squeaks 5months. Anyways, i got an mri scan on both knees as both tendons were burning in february and it showed that there were partial tearing of my cruciate ligament.

I since went to two consultants who i explained the story but the ligaments are sufficiently strong they say and defo am not to be put under the knife. However, i've rebuilt all my quads and hamstrings now but have a permanent niggle on the medial (inside of my right knee) where the mcl inserts into the tibia. There's no giving way in either legs but i'm wondering does anyone know anyone that has experience partial cruciate ligament tearing and kept running at marathon training standards?

I'm concerned about early wear and tear?
Thanks in advance.
gary
 

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Hi Gary

The important point is whether the ACL is lax; because if so this will allow abnormal movement and increased wear and tear on the joint, just like a loose wheel bearing causes increased wear.
I would suggest you see the best orthopaedic surgeon you can find...ask around....get one with an interest in knee injuries..and get him to check your knee for abnormal movement. Take your MRI to show him

David
mobilediagnostics.info
 

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Gary, my brother tore his anterior cruciate ligament in a motorbike accident 20 years ago when he was 17, he never had any surgery on it (I don't know if they did that back then) but it has never been the same since. I am no expert by any means on these injuries but although he is fully mobile, doesn't limp etc, he can't play sports for long anymore due to pain even now it gets debilitating for him and I would advise you seek the best medical advice you can on this if there is any possibility they can repair it for you, good luck
 

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Gary, my brother tore his anterior cruciate ligament in a motorbike accident 20 years ago when he was 17, he never had any surgery on it (I don't know if they did that back then) but it has never been the same since. I am no expert by any means on these injuries but although he is fully mobile, doesn't limp etc, he can't play sports for long anymore due to pain even now it gets debilitating for him and I would advise you seek the best medical advice you can on this if there is any possibility they can repair it for you, good luck
Yes..the ACL is a key stabiliser of the knee joint, and there is no other structure to take over if it is torn. why doesn't your brother get advice on a repair now....the techniques are very good ...but as you say you want to be sure of the experience of the guy that does it. at the very least ask him or her about their results...they should be able to tell you how many they've done and how many have had a good outcome. A good surgeon with good results will be pleased to give you this information. If they won't give you this data then run (or limp) somewhere else.
David
 

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I personally have a lax ACL from falling down a set of stairs and tearing the ACL MCL of my left knee about 2 years ago now.

I am in the medical field and thus know the percentage likelihoods of successfully correcting ACLs and MCLs surgically vs through nature and time. Now, I am not some sort of nature nut, proclaiming that nature always beats medicine (afterall, I am a GP). But, sometimes, the consequences of nature are a little easier to accommodate than the consequences of medicine. Sometimes.

Anyhow, after talking to my orthopedic surgeon...we both agreed that some serious work-up training may allow me to fully offload my ACL to attain essentially normal function. The best part of that plan is that I could start right away (it was 3-4 months post injury at that point), and not have to worry about any post-operative considerations.

So, at this moment, 2 years later, I am running 5-6 miles a day, 7 days a week, I run an obligatory 1.5 mile <10 minute segment per run, keep my speed at or above 8.5 mph (except for warmup period), and am 36 years old, 240 lbs. Sure, my knee hurts occassionally, but I am a big guy, not terribly young and am pushing myself pretty hard. I expect some pain to come with the territory. Interestingly, I am pain free while on the run....hey adrenaline must be pretty good stuff.

I can't say that these results will match other people's. Heck, I commonly seem to be the exception to all the rules. The key is that all strategies will have a success rate and failure rate with them. Not getting cut may actually work for you. Then again maybe not. Seek professionals you can trust and are interested. Then, embrace your solution which ever way you go. The best way to ensure failure is to not endeavor for success.

Hope this helps.

Cheers
 
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