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Hi all

Been running for 6 months now. In doing so I've lost a stone in weight and haven't been this fit ever before. During the last 6 months I've suffered from slight lower back pain and more recently tender knees. However, it seems that day by day after each slight injury heals, the back and knee seems to recover quicker and feel stronger. I did The Miners half marathon on the weekend. I could hardly walk after the run, but my recovery since has been amazingly fast. So here's my question(s)?

a) As each month goes by and I get fitter each day, will the joints natrually get stronger?

b)Every time I run over 8 miles my lower back is slightly stiff a few days later. Will it always be stiff, or will that eventually clear up as time goes by?

c) Is injury and aches and pains all part and parcel of running?

d) Am I the only person who takes anti inflamatorys by the dosen after racing (perscribed by doc)?

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Hiya :)

In answer to your questions -
a) Yes, gradually, but you need to take good care of them as well by doing stretches, wearing good shoes, resting them from time to time, and doing the odd bit of cross-training.

b) Depends what's causing the back pain, it might, but a physio would be able to give you a better idea.

c) Yes :mad: but you get the hang of avoiding / minimising them with time

d) I think one or two other people here take anti-inflammatories. I would suggest, if you don't have any particular medical condition, that you try to wean yourself off them with time as they play havoc with your digestion

Hope that helps :cool:
 

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a) Yup... part and parcel of the exercise, the body will adapt to the stresses and strains being placed upon it... as Katten says though, obviously still make every effort to look after yourself

b)As above, your body will probably adapt, but there's obviously something causing the pain... if you can get a video or photo's of yourself running (side and end on) and you should be able to compare your running style to that of the elites and spot any major flaws (e.g. leaning excessively?)

c) If you want to improve, then yeah, it's usually the case - though there's plenty you can do to help avoid injuries!

d) I do take ibuprofen if i'm particularly stiff/aching after a race, but not by the dozen. I don't think there's really any need for them, but they do make life a little easier. Certainly don't use them to mask pain while you exercise though! :eek:
 

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you can't compare your running style to elite athletes... sounds like is a crazy suggestion... !

firstly, all the elites have many different running styles - so who to compare to?... how can you say which of the elites have the best running style? secondly, you run differently depending on pace... a full out sprint from a beginner, for example, would probably not even match the average pace of a professional marathon runner - so i would not think it would be a good comparison to make at all... !
 

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If we look at a number of elite athletes, we can use a bit of common sense to gauge what the 'average' elite runners gait looks like, though I agree that some elite runners can have ungainly attributes to their running style.

Our gait does change as we vary the pace, and a sprint would require a different posture/motion to a longer distance run, but the main difference between elite athletes and us regular joe's when running is the ground covered with each stride rather than the style of our running or our cadence. I suggested the comparison against elite athletes as they tend to be the best in the world, so I'd imagine they're doing something right!

What would be your suggestion revenged?
 

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having some sort of pain only when running more than 8 miles doesn't sound like it's anything unusual - if new to running and this is the only injury then the orginal poster sounds very lucky !...

i'd suggest just stregthening the lower back muscles if it's a problem...
 

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Aye, strengthening core muscles will certainly help prevent injury, and will usually encourage a good posture too.

Perhaps I should've reworded my original post a bit better - there is always a possibility that one's gait has flaws/imbalances, some of which won't cause any problems, others which will cause pains/aches. If we can rule out these aches/pains through ensuring we have a good posture while running then that's one major factor we can rule out - I guess my suggestion of comparing against an elite was a crude method that anyone could do themselves, rather than (as it seemingly may have been taken) as the definitive guide to how you should run.
 

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d) I think one or two other people here take anti-inflammatories. I would suggest, if you don't have any particular medical condition, that you try to wean yourself off them with time as they play havoc with your digestion

Hope that helps :cool:
My physio once told me to try and avoid anti-inflammities if at all possible as they tend to help mask any problems by killing the pain and reducing swelling whilst the originally injury can stil be hidden.
 

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anti inflam's are pretty evil things. I would try and avoid them unless you have no other option.

High dosages of omega 3 fish oils will help. I have hurt my shoulder at the moment and i'm taking 10 caps...along with a few other supplements to try and help. If this doesnt work then i will go for the anti-inflam's
 

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Anti inflams are fine if you don't have asthma, you take them on a full stomach ie after meals and you keep them to a short course.

There is no need to be in pain. It doesn't make you a harder person ;)
 

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I think there is allot of evidence to suggest they are really badfor your gut, heart and liver. There not something i would want to take too often.

Anti inflams is one of the leading causes of ulcers in the stomach.
 

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I think there is allot of evidence to suggest they are really badfor your gut, heart and liver. There not something i would want to take too often.

Anti inflams is one of the leading causes of ulcers in the stomach.
They can be if taken incorrectly and overused. They are excellent at reducing the inflammatory process and pain in the short term. Anti Inflams are not prescribed and should not be used long term.

If administered correctly they play an excellent part in the healing process.
 

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They can be if taken incorrectly and overused. They are excellent at reducing the inflammatory process and pain in the short term. Anti Inflams are not prescribed and should not be used long term.

If administered correctly they play an excellent part in the healing process.
I personally do not use them as believe they only mask problems which in the long term can causes further injury by thinking your ok as the swelling has gone done. I'd rather just use a pain killer without anti inflammatory if its that bad then use get pain relieve with masking any issue you may have.
 

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surely if you can't feel the pain then that's masking the issue?! :confused: I think NSAID's are pretty darn useful and there's plenty worse stuff you could be putting in your body!
 

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surely if you can't feel the pain then that's masking the issue?! :confused: I think NSAID's are pretty darn useful and there's plenty worse stuff you could be putting in your body!
Very true Richard painkiller does mask the issue aswell and the reason i only take as a last result, although usually in my case looking down and seeing my ankle the size of a basketball puts me off trying to train on it regardless of pain.

I think this issue is one of those personal choices just like our running trainers. What works for one may not suit the next persn. :D
 

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They can be if taken incorrectly and overused. They are excellent at reducing the inflammatory process and pain in the short term. Anti Inflams are not prescribed and should not be used long term.

If administered correctly they play an excellent part in the healing process.
Im not so sure they play much of a part in the healing process, they interfere with it from my understanding and hinder it.

The inflamation process is part of recovery and repair and should be lt take its course if possible. It inhibits protein synthesis and therefore the recovery/growth/repair of the muscle.

I might not be 100 percent with the above. need to double check but the basics are rght.

But not wanting to seem like im against them full stop, They obviously are handy and needed sometimes, but sparingly.
 
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