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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all! I'm new around here ;)

A little about myself and my running "carrier" so far:

I'm 18. I started running because I wanted to loose weight. I went from not being able to run for 20 minutes continuosly to finding my pace and running for an hour. So I started runinng for 40 mins. - 1h everyday, for a month, than reduced the frequency a little bit. This was approximately a year ago.

Right now I self-diagnosed myself with shin splints and I decided to give myself some rest. It's been 2 months that I haven't ran, maybe a little more. I'm thinking about starting again. This time around I want to improve my running speed etc...

Goals:

- Increase my jogging speed. I think very shortly I will be able to re-run for 1h straight, but in the past I've never improved my speed much.

- Increase my running speed. I was always horrible at anything speed related. I would like to run 500m as fast as possible. Right now I must be in a 1 min. 30 secs approx. (which is really bad...)

All sorts of advice is welcomed. :idea:
 

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If you stopped running because of shin splints then it might be a good idea to start off slowly to make sure you have healed fully. Diving into a 1hour run straight out is the quickest route back to the sofa.

Run a couple of miles at a moderate pace and see how you feel. The following day or the day after, go for 3. After that, if everything still feels ok, you can start something a little more serious.

I deduced my training schedule from the Nike Plus website. You can set up a training schedule for your nike plus gadget but I set it up and then copied the details down into a spreadsheet :idea:. Genius. Probably illegal. But genius.

Once you've completed the training schedule you can go back to the website and either try a higher distance or do the same distance at a more advanced level, which should up your times.
 

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Hi giorgi! Welcome to the forum :d

First thing to do, is to set out your genuine goals - I mean running 500m as fast as possible, is that your main goal? Or would you just like to be able to run 500m in a reasonable time? If you want to train for 500m, then regular 1hour runs certainly isn't the best way to go about it!

Seeing as you've had shin-splints (nasty injury that I wouldn't wish on anyone) - Make sure you're set up with the right trainers, goto a local running specialist who can give you a (usually) free gait analysis and recommend shoes to suit your running style (google 'gait analysis' for more info).

The you need to start easing yourself back into your training... until you've gotten used to your 1hour runs again, I'd not go out more than every other day - your body needs its rest to be able to recover and strengthen - if you were running EVERY day, this may well have contributed to your shin splints!

Once you've got a decent mileage base you can start looking at introducing speedwork, intervals, tempo runs, long runs etc to help you improve various aspects of you running - crack on with your running 'rehab' and we'll cross the details of speedwork etc a bit further down the line (or if you're impatient you could always google it, lol).

Hope that helps. :d
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey, thanks alot to both of you. :)

So, I decided to follow your advice and stick with 'every other day' training. I think I'll start out with 20 minutes and add some time at each workout. How much, I don't know, my main problem is the shin splint on my right leg (I only have it on one of em', which is kinda weird)

I would love to run a gait analysis, but I'm on vacation in eastern europe, ex-URSS and I doubt I will find something like that in here... much less for free :mad: Another problem is that my current shoes are pretty old. So I guess the situation isn't that ideal for training.

So to sum it up:

- Run 20 mins. every other day and add 5-10 mins. at each session.
- Watch out for shin splits.
Now this will keep me occupied for 2-3 weeks (hoping that no injuries show up).

--

I have another question. When I'm injury free, my main limitation is my breathing. I'm running at a tempo that's not too hard, but if I want to go faster I run out of breathe. Same thing as with any short distance runs. For instance in a 500m run, in the last 250m, I feel my hands getting numb because they don't get enough oxygen and I'm basically blue in the face... :sick:

So I guess my main goal would be to improve my cardio, which would improve my speed both in short and long distance runs.

I have no idea how to go about it. I'm told that if you're not running out of breathe when you run and push through it, you won't improve... Is this true?

All kinds of advice is welcomed
 

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best way to improve cardio is quite simply to run high intensities (with high heart rates)... this usually means short intense bursts, and for runners can come in the form of speedwork :)

Speedwork can be in the form of intervals or fartleks... and consist of numerous intense efforts followed by a rest period.
 

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You're not trying to breathe in through the nose and out through mouth are you? :d Private joke - I (posted) something about breathing techniques and we decided it was pointless to try and breathe like that.

You mentioned that you have problems with numbness in your hands when running high intensities; have you had trouble with circulation in the past that you know of? If so, then it might be worth seeking a doctors advice before starting training again. If not, do you experience the numbness in any other situations in your daily routine? Again a visit to the doctors may be something to think about. Sometimes it is quite normal to have a numbness because more of the oxygen is being used in your leg muscles than the rest of your body and this lack of oxygen causes the numbness. As long as it returns to normal quickly (30-60 seconds) once you stop then it should be nothing to worry about - just the body reacting to demand.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Re-Hi and re-thanks :)

The numbness goes away fast, so it's no biggy, thanks for the concern. My sports teacher adviced the breathing technique you described, it doesn't work :D

I googled fartlek and frankly it's way too complicated for me. I'm gonna try intervals once I'm done with rebuilding to my 1h. endurance sessions. I know the basic idea behind intervals, but do you guys have any precise program that's really good?
 

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May I suggest something from one newbies to another:

Do something for a week before you move to the next level. Just because you run two miles it doesn't mean you are ready to run three. If you run two miles repeatedly then you are ready to try three.

Keep at it.
 

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I know the basic idea behind intervals, but do you guys have any precise program that's really good?
Unfortunately not. I think you would need to speak to a specialised trainer for that. The only interval training I have had is at football training but that's basically just shuttle runs, sprints, distance running combined with jumps, touching the ground and bursts of pace. Might be an idea to google training for a specific race e.g. 500m.

Just a thought from my 'A' Level days but, if I remember correctly, there are two types of muscle fibre - one for pace (fast twitch?) and one for distance (slow twitch?). The idea is people with more fast twitch fibres make better sprinters and those with slow twitch fibres make better distance runners. You can focus the development of a specific type of muscle fibre by the training you do (e.g. sprints, interval training for fast twitch and distance, endurance training for slow twitch). My concern is that you don't have a specific goal - distance or speed. When you develop one type of muscle fibre, it is at the demise of the other. So if you did a 1 hour run, your body would focus the redevelopment of the damaged muscle with slow twitch fibres meaning that next time you should be able to run the same distance a little easier but won't be able to sprint as fast (fractionally I'll admit but over time the difference is more pronounced) and vice versa.

I think you should have a think about your goal and then you work on a training regime to accomplish that goal.

Scarily that actually sounds like I know what I'm talking about.
 

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good post matty :d You're right about the muscle types (I think there may even be two types of fast twitch muscle fibres :eek: ) But your post explains things well...

Giorgi - fartleks are VERY simple... you just decide to put random bursts of speed into your run... so whilst jogging along, say to yourself, "right starting at that tree, i'm going to run hard to the end of the road"... do that, recover for a bit, then maybe run hard until you've passed 5 lamposts... it really is that easy!

I think if you want to really be the best you can be in the sport, you need a specific goal - if you want to just improve your fitness and become an all round better runner, just get stuck in with regular runs and you'll soon improve :) There's plenty of training schedules available (try runnersworld website as a starter) which will be of great use, if you want one perfectly tailored to your needs though, you'd best get the wallet out and find a nice personal coach ;)
 
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