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Hey all,
As some of you will know I got some really bad pains in my feet after my first 11 mile run last weekend. I was just wondering if I should look at getting different shoes for longer runs?

Just now I have New Balance 767s and they are really comfy. When I bought them I told the very helpful lassie in the shop that I would be only doing 30 or 40 mins and she recommend these shoes, but now I am training for the edinburgh half and full marathons Im just wondering if I should get a different shoe.

If I do need different shoes I would prefer to get them soon as my first 1/2 marathon is on the 16th March and I don't want to do a run like this with brand new shoes which I havent had a chance to break in......

Yours thoughts please.....

O.
 

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Hi There - I am new to this site but ran my 1st marathon recently. I was recommended by a veteran marathon runner to get ASICS running shoes. There are many types but I went to a special running shop that measured my feet and gait etc., and I found that I had been wearing shoes 1 size smaller than I should for running - plus a great shoe that was (is) really light. Speacially made for running a marathon. My veteran friend also told me that Adidas was also a good brand for long distance - I am not sure of the type but he said to get the lightest. I live in Tokyo so the trends for shoes could be different from where you are...good luck though. It only took me 2 weeks to break in the shoes - so buy this weekend!!!!
 
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I've done high mileage for many years now and I've used Nike Air Pegasus, Saucony Jazz, Asics Gel and New Balance some number or other. I think it's the type of shoe you have rather than the make or model. Remember, in Ron Hill's day, the only choice was Dunlop Green Flash. There was no cushioning or anti pronation technology.

Could it be that your a neutral foot striker and you've bought motion control or support shoes or vice versa? You can have your foot strike taken and analysed easily and then you can buy the shoes to suit.

A. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I went in to a running shop for my current pair of shoes and they made sure I had the correct shoes. Im just wondering whether the shoes I have are more suited to short distance than long distance....I may pop in to the shop again tomorrow.

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The important thing is that they are running shoes and support your feet decently... Long-distance shoes might have a bit more cushioning than shoes for really short distance, eg track or something, but if your shoes are OK to run in for 30-40 minutes then I think they will be fine. If you haven't had gait analysis yet, that's very worthwhile.

To be honest I think the pain is more likely because you are new to that kind of distance. I would be more inclined to just give your body a couple of days to recover and then see how you go on the next few runs.

Best of luck :)
 
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Katten said:
The important thing is that they are running shoes and support your feet decently... Long-distance shoes might have a bit more cushioning than shoes for really short distance, eg track or something, but if your shoes are OK to run in for 30-40 minutes then I think they will be fine. If you haven't had gait analysis yet, that's very worthwhile.

To be honest I think the pain is more likely because you are new to that kind of distance. I would be more inclined to just give your body a couple of days to recover and then see how you go on the next few runs.

Best of luck :)
Totally agree with the above statement. Once your body is used to the distance, it will toughen up and you'll be fine. I've done very high mileage in soft shoes and in hard shoes and I can honestly say I felt no benefit whatsoever from the softer ones. I'm in the market for some new running shoes but it will be a bog standard pair of cheaper ones going in the sale somewhere and not some over priced ones that have more padding than the walls of a lunatics cell. As long as they're a neutral shoe, it won't really matter.

A. :)
 

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Aye... a shoes a shoe... or rather a trainer for a specific gait is a trainer for a specific gait! I don't believe there's such as thing as a short distance and long distance trainer... though that could be argued when you head into the likes of race shoes.
 

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I have 3 types of shoes for trtaining. I have just switched to a much tougher trainer for my longer runs, Mizuno Wave Riders. I find they give a lot more support in the fore foot area and around the heal. I have been training in slightly lighter shoes which are more of a racer, Mizuno Wave precisions, but after 15 miles my feet would ache as the fat pad in the fore foot and heal would take more of a pounding due to the softer sole and lack of cusioning. Then for pure speed work I'll run in racing flats Mizuno Wave Idaten. But I'll run a max of 10km in them, as they are a racing flat. It might be that you need to move up a model of shoe to compensate with the increased milage.

Hope that helps
 

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I think Mizuno are pretty good, I used to train in their racers (to avoid shin splints), I was doing 6-700 miles in a shoe weighing less than 250g. And I still have old pairs in 1 piece which I use for beach running, nothing has worn out, glue is still holding everything in place and the uppers are still fine. I've only ever gone through the soles of 2 pairs one was because I wasn't using them for running just everyhting else, the second was because I was doing almost all my runs on steep hills and the breaking force ripped the soles back. But mizuno's are tough!
 
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