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Discussion Starter #1
I used to get lots of shin/knee pain when running and figured it was down to my shoes, however by stopping heel striking I found that the pains all stopped.
I currently run in either court shoes (trainers with flat soles and v.little padding) or basketball shoes (curved sole and lots of padding) and I don't really notice any difference now that im not heel striking.
So basically is it worth getting specialist running shoes? (I wouldn't spend more thaa £40 on them, im a bit short on cash at the moment) Or should I continue using what I have considering its not causing me any pain?
Thanks
 

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They are essential even if they are the only piece of running kit you buy, invest in a good pair of trainers, and have a gait analysis done at a running shop but not the likes of JJB sport.

Having the anaylsis will tell you what type of shoe you need and you will be given a choice of brand to choose from, hope this helps.

TT :d
 

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You may be one of the very few lucky ones and get away with it, but you're more likely to risk injury if you don't wear proper running shoes for your particular gait

If you're short on cash you could get a free gait analysis here... http://www.techtours.co.uk/

and then buy the recommended Asics shoes, or type of shoes that you need that are not Asics, online where they are generally cheaper
 

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Hi
I used to run in any old trainer but as my mileage increased so did the problems such as shin splint, painful knees etc so get your gait checked out it may save you a world of pain.

smithy
 

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steepler said:
How many miles a week are you 'running'?
I'm guessing not many if you have no problems.
I too would recommend getting proper running shoes to suit your running style (personal expierence i have learned the wrong shoes CAN criple :()

Although saying that i have a friend who runs for a club and buys two pairs of £6 running shoes from lydl's a year and has never had a problem. She tends to run 20+ miles a week in them at a rough guess (Lucky mare mine cost £100 Dam over pronation).
 

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From the sounds of things your now more of a forefoot striker (rather than a midfoot), having come from being a heel striker.

Forefoot striking seems to be a little more forgiving on the joints, though I believe tends to put more strain on muscles (particularly calf muscle which will stay contracted throughout your run). As a result you don't require the same level of cushioning that a heavy heelstriker would need, though I'd still go for a gait analysis and see what the shop recommends...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I run about 15-20 miles a week at the moment. I'll try to get to a specialist running shop soon to find out my gait and get some real shoes.
Thanks everyone
 

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twinkle toes said:
not the likes of JJB sport
Nothing wrong with JJB; bought my asic gels (£39.99) from their at the weekend using my father's day money. Run in them 3 times with no probs:d
 

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High street shops are okay if you know what trainer you need... I think the general opinion is NOT to goto such a store to seek advice on which trainers would be most suitable.
 

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i have a similar story... i stopped heel striking after having plantar fasciitis and learnt to run pose style (i.e. forefoot/midfoot landing)... i found it hard to change despite being relatively new... my calves were murder for two weeks and i felt like i had to start from scratch again... it wasn't easy and the advice i got on the internet just made me have a hatred of the runnersworld website - so much so that i refuse to use it now... i am glad i changed how i ran because my plantar fasciitis went away and, unlike before, i am able to run all the time now... so i think it helped...

as for running shoes... i had a lot of problems... my shoes only lasted me a few months as i wore out the outside middle bit of the shoe, which wasn't very padded... after my second pair of shoes were ran out in just over two months i decided to go to a proper running shop... after i ran on a treadmil and they looked at me run and was told had a normal gait, i asked for shoes that have added support on the outside midfoot... was given a surprised look... it seems pretty much all shoes are designed for heel strikers and so have very padded heels... so don't expect to be offered a choice of shoe if you run midfoot... i was offered only one pair and i went to a large running specialist shop... i did ask the guy and it seems midfoot landing is uncommon in runners - there is not much of a shoe market so there are few shoes... everyone else in the shop had tens of shoes in boxes around them and i had only one but they are good so far... i may be wrong, i don't know many runners... this is just my impression from the odd look i got from the guy in the shop and the fact that i was only offered one shoes whilst others were offered tens of them... i had a look on the pose running website (not a big fan tbh - the website was terrible, only the videos on it were any good) and they recommend shoes that look like plimsoles and seem a bit rubbish to me... they wouldn't last me very long and i'm nothing special for a runner... they don't seem to offer much support for running shoes and it doesn't seem much better than running bearfoot... this may be just my opinion... tbh, i'm a bit confused on what you should do... i don't know much about shoes but it seems to me that everyone has their own views and what works for you and me may not work for most... i suggest that you do not rely on shoe reviews or hearsay... it would be best get yourself to to a specialist running shop and try them out for yourself...

hope that was helpful...


btw, can richard or someone else can clarify, but i thought forefoot running, midfoot running and pose running were essentially three names for the same thing... i though that it's basically the blue guy instead of the red (see the link below) - i.e. where you land on the outside middle part of the foot instead (of the heel) by having shorter, quicker strides and not overstriding?...

http://www.perfectcondition.ltd.uk/Articles/Running Technique/forefoot1.gif
 

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I would refer to landing on the outside middle part of the foot as midfoot striking... forefoot striking is virtually running on your toes - landing on the front part of the foot. Difference being that heel striking will land on heel and roll forward to toe, midfoot will land with heel and forefoot in touch with ground and rolling forward to toe-off, forefoot will just land on the toe area.

As with all my posts, this is just my understanding from information I've read ;)
 
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