Runners Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Im a gait analysis virgin :embarrassed: and decided to finally splash and get properly fitted for trainers.

I'll probably head to Sweatshop in Teddington tomorrow. I hear they have the largest selection.

Is there anything in particular I should look out for? Or should I just let the experts get on with it and let them tell me what I should buy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I guess Im just looking for a general training shoe. I've had some small problems with my right knee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
Take your current shoes with you.They always seem interested in knowing what you have been wearing and how they have worn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I read somewhere that an experienced runner had advised people not to use stability or motion control shoes, but to allow the foot to follow it's natural gait.

What are your views on this ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Also interested in Dale's question. I started running in January preparing for my first 10K in May. Best advice I got was to get proper running shoes. Thing is, not knowing what they would cost I popped into a shop one lunchtime just to check prices, I didn't have time to try anything, but after explaining what sort of running I was about to do I was shown a couple of pairs of shoes including Asiics by a guy who seemed pretty knowledgable and helpful, explaining the benefits of what he was showing me. Returned on the Saturday ready to try some, and found Saturday staff more interested in chatting to some people they knew, got fed up waiting for attention and left. To cut a long story short, I then went to a big name sport store, where all I did was find the Asiics that had been recommended originally (GT-2100) and tried them on. They felt OK, so I bought them, and to be homest I was absolutely delighted with them. As I started training, building to the 10K in May I had the odd problem with pain here or there, and niggles, but not one single problem with my feet. I ended up so impressed with the shoes I had that I bought a pair of Asiics GT-2110s when I later seen them on offer. So, after so much rambling, I'm really happy with my shoes, but have never had gait analysis - should I still think about having it done, or do I just carry on with shoes I am comfortable in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Don,
The shoes you have are stability shoes i.e to correct overpronation (that's the rolling in of the foot during the gait cycle). Sometimes an experienced sales person can look at your legs and feet and its obvious that you are slightly flat footed.

About 70% of the population overpronate so probably need some form of support. I would say if you like the Asics GT-2110's (many runners do) and if you haven't any injuries or problems with the shoe then the rule of thumb is to stick with them.

Incorrect footware can lead to problems in the knees, hips and lower back. I think if you are going to run without supported footwear (when you possibly need it) them you really need to focus on your running style and biomechanics and that takes a lot of concentration and a lot of time and may possibly be too much for more biomechanically inefficient runners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I got a pair of Saucony Grid Omni 5's. I was very impressed with the staff in Sweatshop. They really knew their stuff and spent a lot of time with me trying different styles, etc.

Tried them out yesterday and they felt fantastic. I love the cushioned feel of new trainers!

Fingers crossed they help with my knee problems now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
I've just come back from a near-by running shop where I had another gait analysis on a treadmill.

The shop bloke was surprised I was wearing orthotics in a stability shoe (Brooks Adrenaline) so I gave him a bit of background and said basically that were not providing sufficient supporton their own. He was fascinated and wanted to know why I hadn't tried a motion control shoe - nobody seemed to think my pronation was severe enough and my feet did different things.

He got me to try lots of different shoes including the Ascis 2110 (because I wanted to try them) but they didn't provide enough control. The Kanyos were much better but were too tight around the ankles. I tried a pair of motion control shoes (Saucony Stabil MC5) but they were awful and if felt like my feet were all over the place.

The conclusion was that the combination of Brooks Adrenaline and my orthotics were working for me but at the sacrifice of some cushioning in the fore foot area (I land on my fore feet). A shoe that seemed to suit me just as well was the Mizuno Lady Wave Nirvana as it was more structured and had plenty of cushioning in the fore foot area.

I also wanted to try the Saucony Grid Omni 5 but they didn't have them in stock so I'd be interested in your opinion of them bone idle - what's the fore foot cushioning like and how stable are they?

I'm going to stick with my Adrenaline orthotic combination for now but I'm going to need a new pair of shoes before the Plymouth half at the end of May.

Interestingly the bloke at the shoe shop said that retailers often recommend Asiscs 2110 for neutral runners as well because they have good cushioning and they aren't too structured.

The problem I have with gait analysis is that there is a certain amount of subjectivity so although they may agree on the fundementals e.g. you need more support the variety of opinions can get quite confusing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Edwina, I only did a short run in them yesterday but my opinion so far is that the cushioning is very good, without being over cushioned if that makes sense. A couple of other pairs I tried seemed to have too much cushioning which made the shoe feel bulkier.
Stability is excellent. In the others I tried, my foot moved around alot and I was very conscious of that. Whereas in the Saucony's my foot felt moulded to the shoe and the stability was great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
My first pair of shoes were a pair of Saucony Grid Hightail - an entry level neutral cushioning shoe. It was like wearing a pair of slippers and when I go back to them now (I don't run in them anymore) they feel really spongy in comparison to my Brooks Adrenaline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I had a gait assessment about 6 months ago. Was told (shown) I have a slight over-pronation in my left foot.
I was also told that I heel strike, and was recommended Nike Structure Triax 9's.
Although the shoes feel great, I have noticed that after running for a few miles my style seems to change. Instead of heel striking I seem to shorten my stride and land on the outer part of the foot.
How can this be catered for ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Interesting you should raise this because I was talking about this issue with the sport shop bloke. He was asking if I would ever consider a marathon and that your gait tends to change over long distances. I may be wrong but either you have different sorts of shoes for different distances or you have to focus on your biomechanics a bit more when running.

If you look into other running styles such as pose or chi-running they have a set of drills to practise the running pose but they both say its not an overnight fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Blimey, what a lot of info. I have been meaning to get a gait analysis for a while. I use orthotic insoles in some naff Reeboks, heel is quite comfortable, but I think I can feel the stones through the sole now. I have only done about 280 miles in them. Think I will treat myself. I had a shin problem, but without really thinking about it much lately, I think it has eased up.
Do you really get what is best for you, or may some shops be trying to 'promote' certain shoes or sell stock?

Think I will take my smelly old trainers and see what they say, probably never seen anyone run quite like me!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Bagpuss

You will notice the difference immediately with new shoes.

Go to a proper running shop. Staff know what they are doing and will recommend the correct shoes for you, not the most expensive.
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Bagpuss, I definetly did not feel pressure to buy one particular brand. But I think you'll find that there will be a couple of brands that suit your feet. I was shown mainly Saucony and New Balance. There was a girl beside me who was trying on all Asics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Thanks Dale,

There are several good running shops within my area, I will be very interested in 'my assessment' and some advice on running shoes and style, and invest in something more suitable to my style of running. Will keep you posted. Watch this space, new PB on its way!!.....maybe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Hi Bagpuss

I would strongly recommend getting your gait analysis done and getting proper trainers...I suffered shin splints really badly for the first while but after having gone to a proper running shop they got me sorted and the difference is like day and night....good luck
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top