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Hey folks, I'm new here, my name is gordon from bonie scotland, I only started running about a year ago, before that i wasn't very fit at all, ate rubbish, smoked 20 a day and i have asthma so when i first started to run and couldnt run 20 meters without being out of breath, any how to cut this a short i now run 3 to 5 times a week and i'm currently running 4 miles each time in roughly 40 mins which i'm quite happy with although of course i want to get this down, anyway I'm getting into heart rate training but i'm a little confused about the zones, i ran last week, it took me 38 mins, my heart rate average was 167, i ran today at a slighlty slower pace, it took me 42 mins, my average heart rate was 158, that to me doesnt seem like much of a drop. is the heart rate percentage from 0 to max heart rate or is it resting heart rate to max heart rate? I just need to know i'm in the right zone.

Thanks for any advice

Gordie

here is my stats

resting heart rate 50
max heart rate 195
age 29
weight 14 stone
 

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Hi Gordon

Welcome to RF :d

I too also run to HR below are my ranges the % doesn't change.

My Max Heart Rate (MHR) 183

Recovery run - 112 -131 60-70% MHR

aerobic fitness run - 131 -159 70-85% MHR

tempo or threshold run - 159 - 168 85-90% MHR

speed training/race pace - 159 - 183 85-98% MHR (generally run about 175 no lower)

These are the ranges I use through out a normal week for running.

I hope this helps TT :d
 

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Your 'working heart rate zone' will be the difference between your resting HR and your Max HR. It might not seem a lot but 158 and 167 could be the difference between comfortable aerobic exercise and threshold exercise (as demonstrated by TT's scale above :))

It's worth knowing what your own personal zones are so that you can train effectively with an HR monitor. You have a really good resting heart rate, which is a good sign, although measuring your recovery rate is generally considered to be a better measure of fitness.

Based on your calculations, your training zones would look something like this:

upto 151 bpm - Recovery (restore glycogen levels)
151 - 166 bpm - Aerobic (improve your ability to transport/use oxygen)
166 - 180 bpm - Anaerobic (improve your lactic acid threshold)
above 180 bpm - Speed work (you can't usually keep this up for long, or at least I can't! :p)

It's important to work the odd recovery session into your regime so you don't 'burn out'. It's also important to do a range of both aerobic and anaerobic exercise, although working aerobically generally allows you to run for long and so build up general stamina etc.

Hope this helps!
 

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Very useful posts.

Its probably worth adding that calculating your MHR from the formulas is pretty inaccurate so you may need to adjust your MHR upwards or downwards based on your own feeling.

For example from one of the formula my MHR is 188. On a run I saw my HR go to 196.
 

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Very useful posts.

Its probably worth adding that calculating your MHR from the formulas is pretty inaccurate so you may need to adjust your MHR upwards or downwards based on your own feeling.

For example from one of the formula my MHR is 188. On a run I saw my HR go to 196.

You're right Damo, I probably should have mentioned that they are estimated %'s. One way to discover a truer reading of your MHR Gordan, is to run 400 meters at a hard pace then another 400 meters all out. There are other ways to do this and it is recommended that you carry out this check every 6 months. It is also worth noting that if you have suffered from any illness within six weeks prior to this test or you have raced hard recently you probably won't achieve a true reading.

Watches don't always give perfect readings either! :d

I presume you are only interested in a general rule of thumb anyway, as I know I am :lol:;)
 

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One way to discover a truer reading of your MHR Gordan, is to run 400 meters at a hard pace then another 400 meters all out.
I've read this, too. Does it make the 800m the most hardcore track race? Was always my distance of choice :p
 

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I've read this, too. Does it make the 800m the most hardcore track race? Was always my distance of choice :p
They always used to say the 400m hurdles was the hardest track race, along with the 3k steeplechase. I would think the 800m would also be up there in terms of sheer hardcoreness ;)

I think the 100 and 200m is for wusses. Can't believe those guys strut around like they are the shit when all they can handle is 10-20 seconds of discomfort.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Hey guys thanks very much, some great points there, yeah according to calculation my mhr should be 191 but i have had it up to 195, I'm sure i read somewhere though that the percentage was from nothing and not from my resting heart rate :'(

When i was running my 4 miles yesterday my average was about 160, if i was to go into the recovery zone i would be running very slow i feel, maybe that is the point?
 

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When i was running my 4 miles yesterday my average was about 160, if i was to go into the recovery zone i would be running very slow i feel, maybe that is the point?
Does a recovery run boost glycogen more than rest? I had thought it was more to "shake out" muscles, but I am new to this!
Recovery runs can be frustratingly slow but all I know is that, after a recovery session my legs feel a lot better for it. Less tightness through the calves or anywhere else. Don't ask me about the science of it :)
 

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I agree :d
 

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The problem i have with a recovery run is i feel i could walk quicker!!:worried:
I sometimes have the same problem - especially if going uphill! I want to say to passers-by(!) 'I can go faster you know!!' :lol:

That's just it though, if you go faster you're working harder and it defeats the object. I try to get one recovery session in a week.
 

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resting heart rate 50
max heart rate 195
age 29
weight 14 stone
Based on your max and resting - your zones are:

50-60% 123 137
60-70% 137 152
70-80% 152 166
80-90% 166 181
90-100% 181 195

You should be using you Working Heart Rate (which is MHR - RHR) - so 60% of your WHR plus your resting rate.

If you only took a % of your max - then you recovery range (60-70%) would be:
117 - 137
But using working heart rate method the actul 60-70% range is:
137 - 152

As you can see a significant difference, and a much truer reflection of your correct zones.

I hope this is clear, but if not give me a shout and I'll explain further
 

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The Percentages are:

60% to 70% - The Energy Efficient or Recovery Zone
70% to 80% - The Aerobic Zone
80% to 90% - The Anaerobic Zone
90% to 100% - The Red Line Zone

For a much more detailed account of the benefits of each zone look here: Heart Rate Training Zones

But the important part is that these zones relate to the Working Heart Rate method, and a lot of people apply them to the simplified % of max. - so you are probably training below your desired zone if using %ofMax.

My resting = 38
My Max = 204
My WHR therefore = 166

So under the 2 differing methods my zones would be (WHR method in bold)
60-70% - 138-154 | 122-143
70-80% - 154-171 | 143-163
80-90% - 171-187 | 163-184
90-100% - 187-204 | 184-204

Its clear the significant difference (the differences are even more pronounced the higher your resting rate is) - especially at the lower percentages - and would probably explain why Gordie feels he is hardly trying in the %ofMax version of the recovery zone
 
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