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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am 40years old, always been relatively fit. I have a heart rate monitor for running now. When running a 5k, my HR is pretty consistently at 185bpm for the majority of the run once warm up is complete. It is also the same give or take a few BPM when I do a 10k run. 5k time is around 25mins, 10k around 55mins. At no point during either of the runs would I describe my pace as at my absolute limit. I have checked manually and I would say it's pretty close, obviously hard to tell at 185bpm mid run. A. Is there something wrong with me B. Am I pushing too hard and need to slow down C. Does this maximum HR of 220minus your age actually apply?!
 

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220 - age is a rough guide at best.( I am 65 and during a race I average 170bpm), perceived effort may be a better guide.
Is your HRM a wrist based one or a chest strap? I find my chest strap to be more accurate and consistent than the wrist based one.
 

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Can I ask whether the 5k and 10k times you mention are in a race situation or during training exercise? Also, as Double5 asked, what type of heart rate monitor are you using?

It's usually possible to tell from the HR chart in an app like Garmin Connect or Strava whether the heart rate readings are accurate. You will get used to spotting any reading errors, spikes or fall outs etc.

If you have only recently started using an accurate HR monitor it can take some time to build up a picture of how your body responds to training stimulus and running intensity.

My comment would be that your 5k time is more impressive than your 10k time. Your 25mins for 5k would predict more like 51-52mins for 10k with appropriate training. That said, I would still expect your overall average HR to be lower for the 10km effort given you are running at 5.30/km versus 5.00/km for 5k. It could be down to heart rate drift over 10k if you are not fully trained to handle the longer distance. But impossible to say for sure without looking at the HR data.

If I could offer advice it would probably be to ensure you are getting accurate heart rate readings before drawing conclusions. And then, rather than worry too much about the 185bpm, focus on getting your training in place based on your goals. I have concluded after 10yrs of training that it is better to go out and train based on feel rather than looking at heart rate too much. Yes look at the heart rate data and analyse it after training/racing but try not to focus on it too much during. It can cause stress and anxiety in my experience and I talk as someone who became very obsessed with heart rate out on the run! I've come on leaps and bounds since I started paying less attention to it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not in competition or anything, just for fun. It's a Huawei watch. I did check using fingers in the pulse for 6 seconds and multiply method. 180 was about right. It's a dead flat route so no hills or anything. Been using the watch since January. My biggest "worry" is that it doesn't feel like I'm at 100%, definitely feel I could go faster and try harder
 

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Ok, I'm not familiar with Huawei watches but assume it is an on wrist heart rate monitor. My experience with Garmin on wrist monitors is that they are unreliable. They will usually drop in and out and spike and many say they pick up the cadence of your running as much as heart rate! So I would take those with a pinch of salt. I have found that the general 24/7 readings are a bit better. I do use the overnight resting HR data from my Garmin for example as a good guide.

Only other comment is that if you are just running for fun then there is certainly no need to worry about not feeling like you are giving 100%. In fact, I would never recommend you train at 100%. Save that for races and competition if you are inclined to enter any. I am not an advocate for all out efforts in training as I think the "risk versus reward" isn't really there. But I suppose if you plan to never enter races I would understand why you might feel like you want to find out what you can do!
 
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