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Discussion Starter #1
I ran a bit of a hilly 10k yesterday - going up the main incline of the race was tough, and I overtook a lot of people walking up it, it wasn't like it was a fun run either, there were mostly club runners! So going up the hill I was pleased with myself that I didn't give in to the hill and just kept going on a really hot day too.

The thing was, although I never saw some of them again, one or 2 of the walkers came sprinting past me on the downhill sections later - so I wonder if I blew it by keeping going up the hill, or would the better strategy have been to walk it? At the time, I thought, this is a run, not a walk, and I was kind of bemused by the people walking.

Although obviously the strategy worked for the 2 who overtook me, as I never managed to catch them again! :huh:
 

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Good question.

It would be interesting to find out if the two runners that overtook you actually had the walk and then downhill sprint as a strategy or whether that's just how it worked out.

I think the only way you can find out for definite is to map a course that has some decent inclines and declines you can practice on. Try the constant pace all round and note the time, then do the walk/sprint the next time around and compare.

Of course the best solution would be to run up and then sprint :p
 

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Run to your strengths is what I always say! well not always, but it's what I'd suggest in this instance ;)

Some people descend better than others, some climb better... some can only run on flat! I know in one ultra-marathon (comrades possibly?) the most experienced runners will walk up the hills to conserve energy for the rest of the event, though that's obvously a little different to a 10k!

I'd love to see some science behind the most effective race plan in terms of hills :)
 

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I train on hills all of the time - not by choice - I'm surrounded by them. I've found that training with a heart rate monitor has helped me manage them a lot better than previously.

As long as I don't let my heart rate go too high when going up, then I recover fairly quickly on the descent. But, if I let it go too high on the ascent I'm still trying to recover when I get to the bottom of the hill.

To keep my heart rate around 85% of maximum on the really big/steep hills I have to go so slowly that I would probably just as fast walking - so in my humble opinion... there may be an argument in favour of walking up the steeper hills to improve your time for the run as a whole.
 

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I tend to find that once I start to walk I find it very hard to get out of that habit and it completely runs my run and it becomes a bit stop / start from then on in.

I still like to get back and pat myself on the back for not walking.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies. I can relate to what Granty says - as soon as my weak side gets wind of the fact that I am going to stop and walk when things feel tough, the negative little voice urging me to stop will just become louder! I like to just keep going, it's still a big thing for me to run the whole distance and get through the temptation to stop and walk!

I could try running a bit slower up the hill though - in this instance, the main incline came at about 2k and lasted till about 4. Normally when I run, it's not until about 4k that I get into a rhythm and start to motor along at a decent pace - so I suppose the hill coming early on threw me, as instead of jogging up it, I kind of attacked it, but that early on it was tantamount to starting the race at a much faster pace than I should have - which is why I ended up struggling later on, as well as the heat I guess.

Ah well, at least I have a course PB to aim for next year - and will have more experience all round by then of both hills and flats :cool:
 
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