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Discussion Starter #1
How bad does the weather have to be to stop you from running? I'm facing this dilemma for the first time in my running life: it's raining cats and dogs and I'm not sure about going out for a run or not :( It's not too cold, around 9º. The only good thing is that the beach will be completely empty!!! No kids, frisbees, DOGS, walkers, only me, the sand and the rain :d
Shall I take my sweater or it will only make it worse as a sponge? Shall I take a rain coat? I guess it will make my sweat too much! I don't have any super-technical equipment for running under the rain...
Any advice, encouragement for this coward will be appreciated ;)
Ah, by the way, I'm just a beginner: I do around 6 km in approximately half an hour (I don't manage to extend the length yet), so I wouldn't be exposed to the cats and dogs too long :)
 

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If you're thinking about it that much then it's important to you... so get out there!!

I used to feel the same at times, until I got a long term injury and I couldn't run for months. I would have gone out in any condition you care to mention at that time and that's when I realised how important running was to me.

So now it's just a case of dressing appropriately and getting out there.

It is well worth investing in some extra kit that will make you a little more comfortable in bad weather conditions. It doesn't have to be expensive stuff... there are websites full of bargains for runners.

The basics like gloves and maybe a hat are always good. But a Gilet or light windproof jacket are well worth aquiring.

That's not to say that you should wear loads when you go out in bad weather, you need to have just enough on to keep you reasonably comfortable but when you first go out the door you should still feel cold... you'll soon warm up but you don't want to feel too warm.


By the way, I use to live near Colchester. I lived in Manningtree, and then Dovercourt, before moving over here in 97
 

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Hi Jon

Years ago I would run in any weather. These days the only weather I don’t like running in is windy weather. However, it has to be very windy to keep me indoors. Last week I was running in thick snow, rain and sleet.

Like you I have no hitec gear apart from my Nike legging/tight things, and I only really wear them for when I am incorporating running into my working day. If it’s raining I wear a waterproof. OK I sweat, but the sweat is warm and the rain is cold. If I am going to get wet I prefer the sweat to the rain. Obviously, in summer I will welcome the rain, it will be quite refreshing.:d
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you Zanshin and Trinity!
It's still raining, but I'll be leaving in about an hour...I'll tell you how it goes ;) and yes, I will buy more equipment as I get more serious about running: it's also a good way to motivate myself. When I bought my first real running shoes in February (Asics Gel 1110) I was soooo excited :d much better than doing it with my basketball shoes :confused:
Trinity: I'm studying at Essex Uni, currently enjoying my holidays in my home town in the rainy Basque Country. It's been funny to switch the Essex countryside with the beach as the setting for my running (don't know if I should say jogging as I don't get the subtle difference not being English my mother tongue :rolleyes: )
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, to my disappointment, it had stopped raining :p .
The wind was incredibly strong, though, at moments I felt as if I was running on a treadmill, not advancing at all!
Thanks for your support!!! :d
 

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jon said:
....... with the beach as the setting for my running (don't know if I should say jogging as I don't get the subtle difference not being English my mother tongue :rolleyes: )
Good question Jon. With years of nothing but English I've never really been able to establish any sensible explanation between the two...... unless anyone else can prove otherwise?

The dictionary has this
Jog
to run at a leisurely, slow pace, esp. as an outdoor exercise


Run
to go quickly by moving the legs more rapidly than at a walk and in such a manner that for an instant in each step all or both feet are off the ground.

to me, the explanation that a run is faster than walking includes jogging.


 

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Jon,
on the subject of running gear, do you know Aldi are having a special offer sale this Thursday of running clothing? You can pick up a wind and water proof jacket for 8.99 and the shirts and shorts are only 3.99. They work well in both hot and cold conditions and wash really well. So much cheaper than most places and the quality is very good. get there early though as people usually wait for the doors to open and grab everything!
 

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I've always taken the fairly simple view that a jog is a slow run, and can therefore still be referred to as a run... the term jog is merely a little more descriptive of the type of run...

Perhaps it could be likened to to the usage of 'real ale' (jog) and 'beer' (run) for a better understanding? ;)

EDIT: The beer thing just makes it more complicated doesn't it :rolleyes: Mmmmm ale.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rob said:
do you know Aldi are having a special offer sale this Thursday of running clothing?
Thanks Rob! I've looked at the sale and it looks really good! :)
http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/html/offers/offers_week14thursday08.htm
However, I'm not in the UK at the moment, so I'll have to convince someone to get some of those for me :rolleyes: we'll see if it works ;)
Thanks for the explanation, Richard. I've already seen some examples of this debate in other threads :d I'm still feeling quite a slow runner/jogger, hope I'll improve little by little.
Funny thing is my grandfather used to run 200m. and 400m., he even got to the Olympics in 1924 and held the Spanish record for 200m. for a while......but I didn't get his genes, apparently :( I've always been the slowest in my basketball teams...
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Sorry, 1920, in Antwerp, Belgium. 1924 they were held in Paris. He got qualified to the Paris Olympics too but couldn't go because he had to work! Can you imagine, how amateur they were? He was working in a bank!!! :eek:
 

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jon said:
I'm studying at Essex Uni, currently enjoying my holidays in my home town in the rainy Basque Country. It's been funny to switch the Essex countryside with the beach as the setting for my running (don't know if I should say jogging as I don't get the subtle difference not being English my mother tongue :rolleyes: )
keep up the running jon...

and next season join in the LCL races

http://www.ulathletics.co.uk/london_colleges_league.php

(there are 6 cross country races in london every year where anyone in the nearby uni's can compete - really good fun!)...
 

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richardsimkiss said:
...

Perhaps it could be likened to to the usage of 'real ale' (jog) and 'beer' (run) for a better understanding? ;)

EDIT: The beer thing just makes it more complicated doesn't it :rolleyes: Mmmmm ale.

Are you sure? Unless you're advocating that a jog is more relevant than a run, I don't follow your argument. Being a real ale nut (and no, I don't have a beard!) 'beer' is such a loose description and can cover many breeds (including (God forbid) 'lager')

....perhaps your edit makes more sense! <sips the remnants of a cheap bottle of red wine >
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Revenged said:
keep up the running jon...

and next season join in the LCL races

http://www.ulathletics.co.uk/london_colleges_league.php

(there are 6 cross country races in london every year where anyone in the nearby uni's can compete - really good fun!)...
Thanks Revenged! Sounds like a great idea :) but I won't be in the country next season as I finish my master´s in May... in fact I have no idea of where I'll be :eek: hopefully somewhere with good races to keep me motivated!!! :d
 

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I always go out sun, rain, hail snow ... the cold etc.
only time i don't bother is when i've got a cold/flu or other illness.

You get used to the weather after a while and its really not that bad.

I don't have any hi tech gear either just my hoodie jumper and trakki bottoms.


Jan
 

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scr8pe said:
Good question Jon. With years of nothing but English I've never really been able to establish any sensible explanation between the two...... unless anyone else can prove otherwise?

The dictionary has this
Jog
to run at a leisurely, slow pace, esp. as an outdoor exercise


Run
to go quickly by moving the legs more rapidly than at a walk and in such a manner that for an instant in each step all or both feet are off the ground.

to me, the explanation that a run is faster than walking includes jogging.


The difference between "running" and "jogging" is all relative to each person, or each defined standard...
... If a certain runner is of a standard whereby 5/5:30 minute miling is an acceptable average pace for training; then 6:30/7 minute miling or slower will be perceived as a "jog"...
... similarly, if someone else's optimum training/racing pace is, for example, 8 minutes per mile; then 9:30/10 minutes per mile may be perceived as a jog.

Doesn't it all come down to the factor of "perceived effort"?... One runner's jog is another runner's all-out pace?

Obviously, there's a vast difference in pace between the winner of a race and that of the noble "back-marker". So too, is the difference between what is perceived to be a jog and a run.
...
 
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