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It's 18 for a marathon. I think it's 17 for a half and 15 for 10k.

Tips for a beginner, try running on softer surfaces to begin with it's harder work but will do less damage to your legs.

Take it steady, yes make yourself work hard, but don't do too much when you aren't used to it.

If you enjoy running after a couple of testers, go to a proper running shop (not JJB or SSportnSoccer/Sportsworld) and have your gait analysed, they will then recommend you a proper pair of running shoes.

Listen to your body.
 

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rob_667minus1 said:
and u got any tips for a beginner
If you are considering running a marathon I would advise training for some shorter events first. Why not find some local 5k, 5 mile or 10k runs and see how you get on. You can then build up to a half marathon and eventually the full distance.
 

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hammerite said:
It's 18 for a marathon. I think it's 17 for a half and 15 for 10k.

Tips for a beginner, try running on softer surfaces to begin with it's harder work but will do less damage to your legs.

Take it steady, yes make yourself work hard, but don't do too much when you aren't used to it.

If you enjoy running after a couple of testers, go to a proper running shop (not JJB or SSportnSoccer/Sportsworld) and have your gait analysed, they will then recommend you a proper pair of running shoes.

Listen to your body.
Just wondering, what do you count as hard surfaces as opposed to soft? All of my runs are on concrete pavements and at least 3 times a week so I'm guessing this probably isn't doing me much good???
 

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Grass = soft
Concrete = hard

Running on grass reduces the stress on your joints and helps prevent injury. You can read Dan Robinsons advice here.

It's not always practical to train on grass all the time though - especially in the winter when its muddy (and slippy).
 

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admin said:
Grass = soft
Concrete = hard

Running on grass reduces the stress on your joints and helps prevent injury. You can read Dan Robinsons advice here.

It's not always practical to train on grass all the time though - especially in the winter when its muddy (and slippy).
Winter is the time to do it in the mud Dan, a lot more fun!!!

But basically as Dan says softer surfaces tend to be grass, footpaths across fields etc..... most things off road.

Hard means tarmac, concrete. Basically roads and pavements.
 
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