Runners Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been running now for 14 weeks, and during that time I have incured a medial ligament problem.

The physio told me a pronounce with my right foot. The problem has always been there but because I have started running I have just agrvated the problem. So far it's been fine with the excersises he gave me. But it's still not right:worried:

But now I have a foot problem:'(it's really sore:':)'(
Mr physio told me I got the injury with the footware I had on the day I got the pain. (wedges was the footwear). It will be 2weeks I have had this pain.

The pain is mid foot and under the arch, and because I'm walking funny now my calf muscle is aching.

Been for a run today and had to finish early as my calf muscle was aching so much I could not go on.

Do you think I need a insole for my right shoe? The physio said it would make things worse. But I cant go on with this, it's really getting me down:'(and yes was nearly in tears with frustration after my run.

Please someone help me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,463 Posts
This is only my opinion.

I have been suffering from calf pain for the last week. This was caused, I think, as running up a steep slope stretched the calf more than it was ready.

As a result I have taken it easy and slowly added incline to my treadmill runs. Today I ran 10k with no problems.

My conclusion is that I need to stretch the calf muscles by a bit at a time and build to a new level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I would suggest you go and see your GP before you do anything else. Just to get things checked out. I have torn my medial ligaments on the left knee and as I have been walking with difficulty it has strained the back of my knee.

Don't do anymore running until you have got a correct diagnosis and RICE the pain and inflammation away

HTH
Nat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,463 Posts
I would suggest you go and see your GP before you do anything else. Just to get things checked out. I have torn my medial ligaments on the left knee and as I have been walking with difficulty it has strained the back of my knee.

Don't do anymore running until you have got a correct diagnosis and RICE the pain and inflammation away

HTH
Nat

Good call. But, Smiler, what does RICE mean. We are not all
medical people.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Had a dig through some of my previous projects :)

R.I.C.E.

Of course each injury has its own methods of treatment, but when looking at suggested treatments for virtually all running injuries and you would be hard pushed not to come across the terminology R.I.C.E. (Winter Griffith 1986, Norris 1998, Kellman 2002). ‘RICE’ is an acronym for rest, ice (or icing), compression and elevation, arguably the four most useful and relatively universal components for efficient recovery from injury. The four treatments should be used in conjunction with each other to ease pain and speed up recovery.

Resting of the injury is fairly self explanatory, if moving the injured area causes pain, this is the body's way of saying stop (UI Healthcare 2005), any injury should be rested; use of the affected body part carries inherent risks of worsening the injury and lengthening the required time for recovery. The body is a self healing unit and assuming adequate rest most overuse injuries will repair themselves, the other elements of ‘RICE’ contribute to the body’s ability to self heal. 69% of those taking part in the self conducted survey found resting the injury a useful recovery method.

The application of ice to a wound (technically referred to as Cryotherapy) is a method proven to speed up recovery and ease patient discomfort, it is low cost, convenient and effective. Typically ice is applied to the wound for a period of up to twenty minutes at a time followed by a rest period of around an hour, this is usually done using an ice pack such as ice cubes in a bag or a bag of frozen peas for example. By applying ice to the affected area immediately after the injury occurs, damage to the muscle is minimised through preventing blood from collecting around the wound by means of causing small blood vessels and capillaries to contract due to the extreme cold (Winter Griffith 1986:476). This is turn reduces swelling at the injured site which causes pain and slows healing (MadSci Network 1998). Finally the ice numbs the nerves in the area to ease discomfort. Over half of those surveyed used icing to treat their injuries.
Compression of a wound can be achieved through various methods, the most convenient of which include taping, bandaging, and the use of shaped neoprene or tubular elastic bandages. Light compression helps prevent or at least reduce swelling, this is because it is easier for the blood to pass through the wound than to swell outwards due to the pressure acting inwards by the bandage (or other means of compression). This leads to improved blood flow at the wound, speeding up recovery by bringing fresh, oxygenated blood to the area and rapidly removing toxins from the injury site. Only 16% of surveyed runners used compression as a tool for recovery, markedly less than expected.

The main reason to elevate an injury is to reduce swelling. Elevation of the injury means raising the injured area above the level of the heart by at least twelve inches (UI Healthcare 2005). By raising the wound above the heart, blood pressure is lowered and the force within the damaged blood vessels is reduced resulting in reduced swelling; this can easily be done by lying down and propping up the wounded area. 19% Used elevation to aid recovery of their
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Had a dig through some of my previous projects :)

R.I.C.E.

Of course each injury has its own methods of treatment, but when looking at suggested treatments for virtually all running injuries and you would be hard pushed not to come across the terminology R.I.C.E. (Winter Griffith 1986, Norris 1998, Kellman 2002). ‘RICE’ is an acronym for rest, ice (or icing), compression and elevation, arguably the four most useful and relatively universal components for efficient recovery from injury. The four treatments should be used in conjunction with each other to ease pain and speed up recovery.

Resting of the injury is fairly self explanatory, if moving the injured area causes pain, this is the body's way of saying stop (UI Healthcare 2005), any injury should be rested; use of the affected body part carries inherent risks of worsening the injury and lengthening the required time for recovery. The body is a self healing unit and assuming adequate rest most overuse injuries will repair themselves, the other elements of ‘RICE’ contribute to the body’s ability to self heal. 69% of those taking part in the self conducted survey found resting the injury a useful recovery method.

The application of ice to a wound (technically referred to as Cryotherapy) is a method proven to speed up recovery and ease patient discomfort, it is low cost, convenient and effective. Typically ice is applied to the wound for a period of up to twenty minutes at a time followed by a rest period of around an hour, this is usually done using an ice pack such as ice cubes in a bag or a bag of frozen peas for example. By applying ice to the affected area immediately after the injury occurs, damage to the muscle is minimised through preventing blood from collecting around the wound by means of causing small blood vessels and capillaries to contract due to the extreme cold (Winter Griffith 1986:476). This is turn reduces swelling at the injured site which causes pain and slows healing (MadSci Network 1998). Finally the ice numbs the nerves in the area to ease discomfort. Over half of those surveyed used icing to treat their injuries.
Compression of a wound can be achieved through various methods, the most convenient of which include taping, bandaging, and the use of shaped neoprene or tubular elastic bandages. Light compression helps prevent or at least reduce swelling, this is because it is easier for the blood to pass through the wound than to swell outwards due to the pressure acting inwards by the bandage (or other means of compression). This leads to improved blood flow at the wound, speeding up recovery by bringing fresh, oxygenated blood to the area and rapidly removing toxins from the injury site. Only 16% of surveyed runners used compression as a tool for recovery, markedly less than expected.

The main reason to elevate an injury is to reduce swelling. Elevation of the injury means raising the injured area above the level of the heart by at least twelve inches (UI Healthcare 2005). By raising the wound above the heart, blood pressure is lowered and the force within the damaged blood vessels is reduced resulting in reduced swelling; this can easily be done by lying down and propping up the wounded area. 19% Used elevation to aid recovery of their
Again the geek in me loves this scientific answer. Nice one Richard:d
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
Had a dig through some of my previous projects :)

R.I.C.E.

Of course each injury has its own methods of treatment, but when looking at suggested treatments for virtually all running injuries and you would be hard pushed not to come across the terminology R.I.C.E. (Winter Griffith 1986, Norris 1998, Kellman 2002). ‘RICE’ is an acronym for rest, ice (or icing), compression and elevation, arguably the four most useful and relatively universal components for efficient recovery from injury. The four treatments should be used in conjunction with each other to ease pain and speed up recovery.

Resting of the injury is fairly self explanatory, if moving the injured area causes pain, this is the body's way of saying stop (UI Healthcare 2005), any injury should be rested; use of the affected body part carries inherent risks of worsening the injury and lengthening the required time for recovery. The body is a self healing unit and assuming adequate rest most overuse injuries will repair themselves, the other elements of ‘RICE’ contribute to the body’s ability to self heal. 69% of those taking part in the self conducted survey found resting the injury a useful recovery method.

The application of ice to a wound (technically referred to as Cryotherapy) is a method proven to speed up recovery and ease patient discomfort, it is low cost, convenient and effective. Typically ice is applied to the wound for a period of up to twenty minutes at a time followed by a rest period of around an hour, this is usually done using an ice pack such as ice cubes in a bag or a bag of frozen peas for example. By applying ice to the affected area immediately after the injury occurs, damage to the muscle is minimised through preventing blood from collecting around the wound by means of causing small blood vessels and capillaries to contract due to the extreme cold (Winter Griffith 1986:476). This is turn reduces swelling at the injured site which causes pain and slows healing (MadSci Network 1998). Finally the ice numbs the nerves in the area to ease discomfort. Over half of those surveyed used icing to treat their injuries.
Compression of a wound can be achieved through various methods, the most convenient of which include taping, bandaging, and the use of shaped neoprene or tubular elastic bandages. Light compression helps prevent or at least reduce swelling, this is because it is easier for the blood to pass through the wound than to swell outwards due to the pressure acting inwards by the bandage (or other means of compression). This leads to improved blood flow at the wound, speeding up recovery by bringing fresh, oxygenated blood to the area and rapidly removing toxins from the injury site. Only 16% of surveyed runners used compression as a tool for recovery, markedly less than expected.

The main reason to elevate an injury is to reduce swelling. Elevation of the injury means raising the injured area above the level of the heart by at least twelve inches (UI Healthcare 2005). By raising the wound above the heart, blood pressure is lowered and the force within the damaged blood vessels is reduced resulting in reduced swelling; this can easily be done by lying down and propping up the wounded area. 19% Used elevation to aid recovery of their


:idea:
Is there any way that this post can be flagged to make it readily available for future reference, and without having to know exactly where it was posted?
Maybe put it somewhere where it would stick out like a sore thumb.

Or toe.:d
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top