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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

I’m desperate for advice, but can I give a quick intro first.

I’m a vet – 62 - and took up running in 1980. Only modest stuff, and nothing more than the occasional half-marathon. While in the Diplomatic Foreign Service I ran in many countries, much of it in the Middle East, hot desert stuff. I’m now retired from the FCO, and work as a research technician.

My running – though modest - has become an integral part of my life, and for some years I’ve been doing a daily 8-miler, before work. Very slow stuff, the first four miles up hill, then a downhill return, with shower and change at the University where I work.

Now, the advice – PLEASE!

Three weeks ago I got back from my morning run. I knew my running had become sloppy - proration(?) - and as I showered I felt rather more than the usual aches and pains. Decided to drive home, went to bed for a couple of hours, then tried to get out of bed. Collapsed on the floor with in agony (thigh and hip), so crawled back to bed. Could hardly move, and for ten days could only crawl round the house on elbows and knees.

Since then it’s been GP-prescribed pain-killers for a week, then a day at A&E for X-Ray and MRI.

Able to stand and walk only after ten days, though presently stiff have vague hip and knee pain, with slight numbness around the knee.

Hospital consultant says the X-Rays and MRI shows nothing of significance – probably trapped nerve in lower vertebrate due to running posture - so just “keep taking the tablets” and wait for consultation with physiotherapist.

I’m still waiting, and meanwhile I’m becoming desperately frustrated by the lack of my daily run. What is it, endorphin withdrawal? I just HAVE to get out again, but dare not risk it until I’m assessed by the Physio’ – but how long does that take? The NHS were great, but they are slow. Maybe I should pro-actively contact the hospital Physio' rather than wait for the system(?)

Aaaaaaah – frustration!

So if anyone has any comments or experience of returning to running after injury, I’d greatly appreciate hearing from them. Ho do you remain patient and not go up the wall?

And sorry for the rant!

Cheers,

Ken.
 

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Hi there,
Sorry to hear about your problem and hope in due course it gets resolved.

Would suggest, if funds allow, a visit to a sports injury physio. I saw one last year for a hip injury and she did wonders...saw her 3 times over a 6 week period and cost about £75 in all. Not suffered since...touch wood!

Re frustration point although I didn't go mad, as I was able to jog during those 6 weeks, my better half has had to be patient during the last 5 months, and has driven me mad, as she has been unable to run due to being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.She went swimming during the summer to keep active. Could you? (She who must be obeyed has now started running again as her medication is working well. )
 

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I agree with Steve. Treatment of non-life-threatening injuries on the NHS is a joke. I would fork out and see a private physio. It may cost you £30 or £35, but if it gets you back running weeks earlier I'd say it's a good investment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
weakness in leg

Thanks very much for you comments and advice. Incidentally, one thing I have noticed since I’ve been back on my feet is the profound weakness in the leg in question. As I said, I’ve been doing daily 8-milers, the first half of which was uphill. Now, when I climb the stairs, it’s fine on the hood leg, but no strength on the left (duff) side. Its as though I was suddenly carrying someone on my back, just for that step. Also there have been times in the street when my leg seemed as though it was just going to fold under me.

I wondered how long it might take me to run again, so just tried running along the landing. It as staggering – quite literally: no strength and no coordination on that side.

I also have a strange lack of sensation on the surface of the skin of the knee on my duff side. When the consultant prodded round there, he used a pin-like device. In the area surrounding my knee his pods were sharp, but over the roughly ten centimetre front of my knee the prods were dull. I seemed to infer some significance from this, though no further than the trapped-nerve conjecture.

Can I have any chance of recovery from a knee/leg which hardly has the strength to get me upstairs? And this was a leg which until a few weeks ago was launching me up four mile long hill-sides.

It’s all rather depressing.

Ken
 
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