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Discussion Starter #1
I'm probably due a new pair of running shoes in the next month or so and am contemplating going to a specialist running shop. I have been running now for 3 years (30-40 miles per week on average) and always purchased a particular brand of New Balance shoes, which have extra cushioning but not support for a neutral runner. I have never had an injury or even a slight niggle (touch wood). My question is, should I bother going and getting a gait analysis, or would I be safe to just keep going with what has worked so far? If my shoes weren't right for my running style, would I have known about it by now?

I know the general answer on this forum is "You must go get a gait analysis and buy proper shoes, even if they are really expensive", but I don't think I want to.
 

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Probably although the body compensates a little but if you didn't buy your shoes from a running shop where did you buy them? I would still recommend going to a local running shop take your old shoes along with you - it will be at least interesting and they are very knowledgable just be honestwith them when you go in.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just buy them off the shelf at JBB sports or somewhere similar. I'm thinking of getting them online next time, because I've seen my brand on-line for £24.99, which is about the price I like to pay. There is no way I'm going to spend £60+ on a pair of trainers every 4 or 5 months.

But maybe I should just get the gait test done, since it is free, then at least I'll know for sure if I do pronate or not and can use that info when buying my next pair off the shelf.
 

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Well its up to you but they are the most importnt part of your kit and most running shops offer discount and they almost always rely on the support of the local running community.
 

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How about going and seeing what they say regarding to what sort of running trainer would suit your running style, once you know nip off to JJB

Jobs a good 'un ! :d:p
 

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Why don't you nick a few tops while you're at it? :p No okay I know that comment's a bit OTT, but the reason you pay a little more at local running specialists is because of the wealth of information and guidance the staff their can offer... of course you're not obliged to buy trainers when you have a gait analysis, but I've always felt that to use their knowledge and guidance only to go and buy your trainers discounted online isn't very moral - but then that's just a matter of opinion I guess! It should be considered though that if everyone had a gait analysis locally and bought online, the local stores would end up closing down and you wouldn't be able to find gait analysis locally, and places could potentially end up charging for it too!

JBBury - in response to your original post - I'd be careful about changing your trainer type now. If you've had no problems at all then I'd stick with what you have.

The 'you should goto a running specialist and have a gait analysis and get shoes that suit your running style' advice in my opinion should apply to new runners and runners who have developed overuse injuries.

If you have always ran in neutral trainers, and have a gait analysis to show you heavily overpronate, then for you to stay injury free, your body must've adapted to accept the overpronation. If you then buy trainers to correct your pronation, it'll change the way your foot lands and rolls, and place a different load on the legs than what it's used to... chances are you'll end up injured!!

Whilst I'm a massive believer in correcting muscle imbalances and flaws in ones running gait, BUT... if it aint broke, don't fix it!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Richard. I tend to agree with you. TBH, when I started running, my right foot did used to collapse in a little on landing, but over time I corrected it by changing my running style, so if I do pronate, it is probably very slight.

I agree with you on the moral issue of gait analysis and buying from the store. The reason I haven't had a gait analysis done is that I would personally feel obliged to buy a pair, and the only place I know in Edinburgh that does Gait analysis only have expensive shoes (cheapest I saw on the shelf were £60 and they didn't even have any New Balance, which are my personal favourite brand. Even if I did need a shoe to compensate for pronation, I wouldn't feel comfortable changing my brand now, since I've done so well with New Balance.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've never heard of them, but I'll check them out. thanks for the tip.The only one I knew of was Run-4-It.
 

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You could always solve the moral dilemma of gait analysis by openly explaining your situation to the running store - perhaps offer them a few quid for a gait analysis? I reckon they'd be quite friendly and probably offer you one for free in the end anyway... as long as you're being honest with them I can't see a problem. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I had a look at their website and they seem really good. I like the fact that they don't use a treadmill for the gait analysis. I will definitely check them out. Thanks :)
 

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ye, they get you to go outside and run up and down the pavement, usually with your trouser legs rolled up and I always head down about 5pm and the looks you get from people on their way home is quite funny :)

O.
 

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last time I went for a gait analysis the guy commented on how he was impressed that I came in running kit... he said he couldn't believe the number of people who came to try running shoes wearing jeans :lol:
 

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Erm, and me!
(If you go to buy a bed, Richard, do you wear your pyjamas? Heh....)
 

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I always wear a pair of shorts under my jeans when I go to buy new running shoes and just take the jeans off in the shop. They need to be able to see your lower limb and its more comfortable than running in jeans with your legs rolled up.
 
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