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Discussion Starter #1
I've been jogging for a year or more now and I got used to my running shoes (just common inexpensive running shoes). I'm 56yo. Not to say that my flat feet make running a bit more challenging, but I mostly got used to it without any major issues, but I'd welcome a more comfy ride to be honest.

All I'm using is flat feet insoles (quite past their recommended use date by the way)

I wonder if it would be worth going to some specialised shop to get orthopaedic adapted shoes which will probably not be cheap.

Any advice much welcome.
 

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Hi Rodion,

I`d say that a lot will depend on how far your running and what type of surfaces your`re running on.

If you`re currently having no real problems with the distance you`re running and your shoes I would`nt say that you need a pair of specially adapted shoes / inserts.

You`ll only really need to do this if you increase your mileage.

What type of mileage / terrain are you running ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Rodion,

I`d say that a lot will depend on how far your running and what type of surfaces your`re running on.

If you`re currently having no real problems with the distance you`re running and your shoes I would`nt say that you need a pair of specially adapted shoes / inserts.

You`ll only really need to do this if you increase your mileage.

What type of mileage / terrain are you running ?
Hi, thanks a lot for your answer. I'm just running 30 minutes 3-4 days a week. I run on the pavement or on a public park. I'm a bit concerned I may get some time of injury some day so I thought it may be safer running with some kind of specialised shoes it that would make a real difference.
 

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Hi, thanks a lot for your answer. I'm just running 30 minutes 3-4 days a week. I run on the pavement or on a public park. I'm a bit concerned I may get some time of injury some day so I thought it may be safer running with some kind of specialised shoes it that would make a real difference.

Hi,

They array of shoes on offer is mind boggling and it really can be hit and miss finding the right shoes that suit your feet and very expensive in the process !

I`d say that if you`re concerned, your first port of call should be a podiatrist who specialises in sports / running.
The podiatrist will not only look at your feet, but the way your foot strikes the ground, your stride, how you stand naturally and will do what`s called a " gait analysis " on a special machine that looks at your gait and how you`re feet strike the floor.

Be guided by what the podiatrist says and they will more than likely make inserts for you to put in your shoes, that will hopefully correct any imbalances that they find.

If you go to a running shop, you`ll more than likely be looked after by staff who are keen runners, have been trained to use the gait analysis machine in the shop, but aren`t podiatrists and as such won`t have the in depth knowledge.

The podiatrist I`ve seen also recommended a brand of shoe that I`d never previously considered and taught me about the way to correctly size ny shoes. Turns out I`d been running in shoes that were too small for me, just like a lot of people and this was one of the reasons for the problems I was having.

If you`re in the North West I can recommend a fantastic podiatrist based in Altrincham.

Obs a podiatrist is going to cost a bit, but I`d say it`s definitely worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi,

They array of shoes on offer is mind boggling and it really can be hit and miss finding the right shoes that suit your feet and very expensive in the process !

I`d say that if you`re concerned, your first port of call should be a podiatrist who specialises in sports / running.
The podiatrist will not only look at your feet, but the way your foot strikes the ground, your stride, how you stand naturally and will do what`s called a " gait analysis " on a special machine that looks at your gait and how you`re feet strike the floor.

Be guided by what the podiatrist says and they will more than likely make inserts for you to put in your shoes, that will hopefully correct any imbalances that they find.

If you go to a running shop, you`ll more than likely be looked after by staff who are keen runners, have been trained to use the gait analysis machine in the shop, but aren`t podiatrists and as such won`t have the in depth knowledge.

The podiatrist I`ve seen also recommended a brand of shoe that I`d never previously considered and taught me about the way to correctly size ny shoes. Turns out I`d been running in shoes that were too small for me, just like a lot of people and this was one of the reasons for the problems I was having.

If you`re in the North West I can recommend a fantastic podiatrist based in Altrincham.

Obs a podiatrist is going to cost a bit, but I`d say it`s definitely worth it.
I see...
to be honest, as this is expensive I'll keep to these shoes for the time being. I'm trying to lose 5 kilos to help me run lighter (I'm 1.87m / 85 kg now). Super thanks for your detailed answer.
 

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Glad to help.

Do a bit of research, as there are some shoes that are better suited for runners with flat feet, also your insoles too.

I wish you luck !
 
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