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Discussion Starter #1
I started running 2 years ago aiming to finish my first marathon. All my running was on paved hilly roads.

Last year while doing my long run at 17Km i felt pain in my left knee. The pain would come back every time i would run so i visited a doctor who said it was tendonitis and suggested rest.

After a couple of months of rest i started running again and was feeling strong. After 6 months I slowly built up to 40-45km a week and again during a long run at 21km the pain returned.

So i did an M.R.I. scan which showed "mild attenuation of the patellar cartilage indicating chondromalacia patellae grade 2".

I am really worried now if this problem will never allow me to run a marathon :(
 

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mild attenuation of the patellar cartilage indicating chondromalacia patellae grade 2
I'm afraid that doesn't mean a huge amount to me as I'm not in the slightest bit medically qualified! :(

I'm not sure if it would help you massively or not, but I had a biomechanical analysis done which analysed what was going on with my body while I was running. From there I was shown any flaws in my running style, and all of these flaws related to pains I was suffering with when I upped my training. Using a number of strengthening exercises to work on the muscles that were letting me down, I've been able to improve my running style and have suffered far less aches as a result. Sometime in the not too distant future I'll be going back for another analysis to see how much I've changed and what I still need to address.

May be worth a try?
 

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Anyone with knee pain should be assessed by both a physio and specialist podiatrist, most cases of knee pathologies are related to muscle imbalances and biomechanical dysfunction. If you havent seen a podiatrist then it may well be worth a visit.
 

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well the same diagnossis with me..I also have that thing..
I have a constant ache in my left leg..whereas when I swim it ends..Interesting..BUt anyhow I will go to pediatre to recover..and I keep you informed about my situation which is to me also confusing....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What am doing to get over this problem

1. Started taking Vitamin C, Cod Liver Oil and Glucosamine Sulphate

2. Started doing exercises to strengthen my muscles and even out any imbalances between the two legs as you can physically see that my right quadricept is bigger than the left (pain is in left knee).

3. I use Deep Heat/Radian B before exercise

4. I had a knee brace that apparently didnt do much so am thinking of buying a neoprene sleeve and use that instead

5. I am determined to compete and finish my first marathon in March after trying to do that for 2 1/2 years now
 

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Let me correct one thing to inform the readers ...

I have gone to pysical therapy doctor..She asked for MR and after MR her diagnossis is Meniscus...There is degenaration in inner and outer meniscus..She said if I had been footballer she will ask for operation but at the moment we shall try some physical therapy..
Now I am in program of daily therapy that will last 15 days...

I can say it helps...I will keep informing...
 

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Chondromalacia of the patella is a fairly common condition especially in any individuals who are intense on their feet (runners, soldiers, concrete walkers, backpackers etc).

Basically its the term used to describe a degenerative state of the cartilage that lines the posterior aspect of the knee cap. In other words, its "wear and tear" of that cartilage.

Now, that's the manifestation of the condition, but that doesn't describe the cause of the condition.

More often than not, it is the result of "derangements" of the alignment of the leg as a mechanical unit. What does that mean? Pound your foot into the ground with a high enough intensity with a great enough weight over a long enough of a time and the arch of the foot will start to fail. The foot simply is not designed to put up with that amount of abuse.

Looking at the ankle joint, its a hinge joint which means it offers range of motion along 1 axis. Thus, as the arch falls, the ankle joint is obliged to pull the tibia inwards. Since you don't fall over because of this, there is reason to believe that your centre of gravity and hip don't change position appreciably. Thus, the femur also has to subtly angle inwards as it approaches the knee. With all that, the quadriceps pulls on the patellofemoral ligament, attempting to rotate the knee into a fully extended position. As the ligament tightens, it tends to adopt a position that is the shortest distance between its origin and insertion, like a guitar string would.

With the knee shifted, ever-so-slightly, towards the midline of the body, this causes the kneecap (embedded within the ligament) to move away from its normal track within the grooves of the bones. This increases the friction and wear on the cartilage under the kneecap.

And, with that, chondromalacia is born.

With all that said, the manifestation sounds pretty serious. But solving the cause is fairly simple. Orthotics to correct the arch of the foot should result in improvement of the symptoms and allow for healing to occur. Anti-inflammatories, maybe some opioid strength analgesics should alleviate symptoms while the healing occurs. Then, physiotherapy to strengthen the involved structures may also help.

But, the condition is waiting to come back. Any time your shoes / orthotics begin to break down, the condition will have a tendency to recur as well. Adopting a practice of switching shoes / orthotics ever 500 miles or so will probably pay off in the long run.

I use generic orthotic insoles because they work for me, and they are easy to replace. With generous rotating of new insoles I can usually extend the life of my runners to 6 to 9 months (3 sets of orthotics) and I run about 5-6 miles a day 7 days a week and am 240 lbs.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the post Cyanide.
I remember when i was younger sitting on my bent knee would cause it to go into a lock. An abrupt intentional moovement would put the knee back in track thus releasing it but that caused me a lot of pain. I dont know if this is something related to my chondromalacia problem now. However the MRI didnt show any other problem (i.e to the bones, miniscus or ligaments)

I need to visit my orthopedic soon to show him my MRI results although i know he will tell me what i already know.

Just want to ask. Icing the knee after every run is something that will help me with this problem?
 
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