Runners Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
:(I have been running Cross Country for about 3 weeks now. The distance we run is 3.1 miles or about 5k. My problem is my strides are to short. My coach says I am taking 2 steps for every 1 step I should take. Which is making me work twice as hard just to keep up. My coach has gave me drills to do but no matter what i do after about 1.5 miles my strides shorten up again. What are some drills or tips or anything to help lengthen out my strides.:(

Please Help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,962 Posts
Well, I tend to take short fast strides too and I prefer running this way. Don't know if your strides are way too short, but I tend to think short striding is more efficient and protects the knees. But I'm not a professional coach so what do I know ;) It works for me. I only use long strides if I'm really pushing the pace or sprinting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,799 Posts
:(I have been running Cross Country for about 3 weeks now. The distance we run is 3.1 miles or about 5k. My problem is my strides are to short. My coach says I am taking 2 steps for every 1 step I should take. Which is making me work twice as hard just to keep up. My coach has gave me drills to do but no matter what i do after about 1.5 miles my strides shorten up again. What are some drills or tips or anything to help lengthen out my strides.:( Please Help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
We all have our 'optimum' stride length which is difficult to alter. But, if you say you can manage a reasonable stride length for 1.5 miles, then it begins to shorten, I'd put this down to a lack of fitness.
All I can suggest is that you try strengthening your legs, putting more power into them, by introducing more hill reps into your training programme and possibly doing some squats with weights a couple of times a week. When you run, lean forward slightly but don't overstride. It is the rear driving leg where the power comes from to determine stride length.
Cheers!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Just a quick thought... have you tried running a flat out mile (or 1.5mile) with your stride length, and then again with your coach's desired stride length to compare which is quicker? I'm not saying your coach is wrong at all... and i've never seen your running style so couldn't comment myself, but major changes to running technique can be counter productive at times... - think about Michael Johnson on the track, if he'd followed the norm and changed his running style, he would never have been as successful as he was ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
But, if you say you can manage a reasonable stride length for 1.5 miles, then it begins to shorten, I'd put this down to a lack of fitness.
I don't think it's lack of fitness - he is fitter than all of us :lol: !!...

Maybe it's starting too quick and tiring half way around ?...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I know it might seem random. But try springsoles.co.uk They're ment to make your stride lengh longer. I didn't notice that much difference in that myself, but i noticed a difference in loads of other areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Dono off the top of my head, I saved it somewhere though if you interested?

I bought a couple more pairs for my mates a few weeks ago before they sold out again. And they sent a nice email saying thanks etc and telling me about 30 people in the big O that are using the soles. On their website there is a list of big clubs that use them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
just a thought... doesn't a slightly shorter stride tend to be more advantageous for xc running? particularly in muddy conditions?

I may be completely wrong mind you :lol:

emoray, as you may have noticed, there's a fair bit of scepticism over these springsoles, general belief being that if they really were 'all that' they'd be much better known than they currently are - I'm sure people would be genuinely interested to see the proof of how they how work and what gains they have bought people in the elite category :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,221 Posts
just a thought... doesn't a slightly shorter stride tend to be more advantageous for xc running? particularly in muddy conditions?

I may be completely wrong mind you :lol:

emoray, as you may have noticed, there's a fair bit of scepticism over these springsoles, general belief being that if they really were 'all that' they'd be much better known than they currently are - I'm sure people would be genuinely interested to see the proof of how they how work and what gains they have bought people in the elite category :)
Someone will be along shortly to say they ran the London Marathon in 2:24 in a pair of them :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
Someone will be along shortly to say they ran the London Marathon in 2:24 in a pair of them :rolleyes:
ooh. I'm running the London Marathon next year :'(, do I need to get some?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
GC: Please *don't* try and lengthen your stride. When your foot plants way out in front, you may think you are moving further, but you're foot is just sat there playing the waiting game until your body catches up. You only move as fast as your torso is going.

The most beneficial thing you can do is actually shorter strides and more of them. Don't stretch your lower leg out in front of your knee joint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,962 Posts
GC: Please *don't* try and lengthen your stride. When your foot plants way out in front, you may think you are moving further, but you're foot is just sat there playing the waiting game until your body catches up. You only move as fast as your torso is going.

The most beneficial thing you can do is actually shorter strides and more of them. Don't stretch your lower leg out in front of your knee joint.

I agree with this. Personally I find shorter, faster strides the way to go. I also think this style helps prevent injury, because there is less stretching of the muscles and lower impact on the ground. I'll only do longer strides if I'm doing some sprinting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Indeed JB. In fact even a sprint speed you can have a long measured stride length, but this is not due to striding out in front but just because your body is moving through the air at a faster rate. See Michael Johnson or recent Usain Bolt as sprinters who use what appears to be a very short stride - but their measured stride length (distance travelled between foot falls) is actualll very long - due to the fact that they spend more time in the air than on the ground. For examples of long distance runners with the same mechanics (short compact stride and hight turnover) look at Haille or Bekele.

Its also beneficial to hit a "turnover" (cadence) of 180+ strides a minute (90 each foot) because only at this rate will your lower leg muscles and tendons (calves, achillees) return the elastic energy that they gained as you land and will actually lift you body up (a return of free energy) so you don't have to push your bodyweight upwards - which is normally a very high energy consumer in running.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top