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Discussion Starter #1
Does this work as you get older?

The Maximum Heart Rate estimate is 220 minus your age, which at my advanced years, is 166.

Looking at training zones, I should be training therefore at a maximum of around 150bpm as an anaerobic threshold and 132 for aerobic training.

In fact, when I've checked on the treadmill at the gym, if I run a long distance, my heart rate regularly reaches the mid 160's. If I tried to keep it down in the low 130's, it would probably equate to a brisk walk.

Does anyone else keep an eye on this?
 

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The problem with that formula is that it gives an average MHR for age, but the deviation from that average is huge, thus making it useless for heart-rate based training. There are people much older than you with a MHR above 200. The most accurate way to get a figure for it is to do a proper stress test, and extremely stressful they are too. I unscientifically use the max reading I had at the end of a race where I gave everything and was absolutely exhausted at the finish, plus a few bpm because I'm a wimp and never quite give 100% :)
 

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I'm 65 and on a bike ride will show an average of about 145bpm with highs into the 160s. If I do intervals on a turbo it will regularly go to 175. I did a ramp test about 15 years at 50 years of age which showed a maximum of 185. I have just started running and have returned from a run with an average of 156. So that formula doesn't work for me.
 

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That's reassuring advice. I've always ignored it, but there's always been that niggle at the back of my mind that I should be concerned.
 

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I have never bothered with factors such as maximum heart rate data and such to help determine training or racing paces.
The individual runners variations from this classic formula of 220-age and its variations are too great to use them as anything much more than a rough guide.
A reputable md/ld coach once said "if you are puffing you are in the anaerobic zone".That plus the Lydiard advice that you should be able to hold a conversation when running aerobically have always seemed sufficient guide.
The run by numbers guides for defining training zones are no better a guide than Lydiard's how you feel on the day easy/medium/hard pace advice.Still,I guess that they do help to justify spending large amounts of money on watches.
 

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I do keep an eye on my HR and use it to train with. Imo it scales with your progress and is a good way of keeping check on your actual effort. Each to their own and if people want to use a different method thats cool too, but this is working for me very well.

I use a slightly different formula called the Karvonen Method.
If I wanted to run between a range of 60-70% of my Max HR Id obviously need to know what 60 - 70% is.

I find 70% of my maximum HR and calculate it like this.
(Max HR - Resting HR) x 70% + Resting HR

Im 40yrs old, so Max HR for me would be (220 - (40yrs old)) = 180
With figures:
(180 - 50) x .7 + 60 = 151bpm

This seems to fit in very well with my performance and so I use it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_rate
 

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Doesn't take into account gender or how the rate of change changes with age. Its also very simplistic since the rate of change each year is more like 0.7bpm. Plus unless you're very fit you won't get there and if you tried hard enough you could go into cardiac arrest, so don't try it. Highest I've seen is 190 a couple of years ago cycling down a hill outside Sheffield. I probably could have edged it higher but at that stage I was going at about 55mph and the slightest change in direction meant I careered across the road and it got scary.
 

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I use Maffetone´s 180 formula so when I train I try not to let my HR go above 135. Works for me.
Same here.. I do run with a club which breaks this on a tuesday and thursday but all my other runs (another 3 a week) I stick to Maffetone's
 

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Interesting comments posted and a thread I will be keeping a close eye on. I never even thought about what my heart rate was/would be until i started using the Garmin and was quite shocked tbh to see the rate go to 179 (max) but i averaged 167 on my last run (10k) which is down from 169 (5k) from the previous run 2 days earlier. Would be very interested to find a correct way (if there is one ) to see where i should be for my age group.
 

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Max HR to age is only a very rough estimation.. You will need to do a max heart rate test to find your true max .. They are not fun..When I done mine I couldn't get off the floor for 5 minutes :)
 

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I use Maffetone´s 180 formula so when I train I try not to let my HR go above 135. Works for me.
I much prefer lydiard ideas,he say it is better to run most
Of your easier runs as closer to threshold level,read somewhere
That mark Allen (triathlete) have used mafftone and decrease
His average mile time within one year from 8min-5:30 '-'
 

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Max HR to age is only a very rough estimation.. You will need to do a max heart rate test to find your true max .. They are not fun..When I done mine I couldn't get off the floor for 5 minutes :)
Should have run harder and made it 10 minutes lol
 

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Agree with Neilster. The only way to find YOUR true HR is to do a max HR test. Will need to be a ramp test and must always be done supervised 1) to make sure you push yourself hard enough and 2) to be safe if anything happens.

I paid a sports coach to do mine as part of a number of tests though easy to do with you and a friend. I also had my lactate threshold tested as well.

It is a must to make sure you identify your true training zones. The formula you quote is too generic.

Interestingly my max HR is different whether running or on the bike.

Cheers

Dan
 

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Interestingly my max HR is different whether running or on the bike.
That's true of me too - and I've read true of everyone. It makes no sense to me. Max heart rate should be the same for either - or so it seems to me! Surely it must be the case that on a bike you aren't standing so aren't using enough muscle to get your heart to it's max. But experienced cyclists wouldn't be limited by muscle fatigue so why can't they match their running max on a bike?
 

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It's more to do with the hydrostatic load on the heart in different postures.
 

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Interestingly my max HR is different whether running or on the bike.
Interesting - haven't encountered that but I've yet to push myself anywhere my max HR when running. On the bike my max HR was 185 last time I tested it - but more useful for me is that I know that, at my current level of fitness, I can sustain a 140-150bpm heart rate for long periods, 150-160 for maybe half an hour - but if I go over 160 I can only really sustain that for a few minutes at a time. That seems to be true on the bike and when running.
 

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Does this work as you get older?

The Maximum Heart Rate estimate is 220 minus your age, which at my advanced years, is 166.

Looking at training zones, I should be training therefore at a maximum of around 150bpm as an anaerobic threshold and 132 for aerobic training.

In fact, when I've checked on the treadmill at the gym, if I run a long distance, my heart rate regularly reaches the mid 160's. If I tried to keep it down in the low 130's, it would probably equate to a brisk walk.

Does anyone else keep an eye on this?
HR based training is a good idea.
your maximum HR is the maximum that it will beat at. You get that figure by experimentation not estimation.
you can build heart rate zones instead based on LTHR...a bit of research on that should keep you busy for a while (some on my site if you are interested but it is all over the place)
 
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