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Yes I know, I am 58 and I expect to have a few aches and pains, but it seems relentless, and was wondering how everyone else gets on. I am returning to running and run about 25 - 30 miles a week, and was a 2.56 marathon runner so know about running. I am just tired of the never ending aches and pains. My hips are continual source of aching, and a few weeks ago, my foot decided to give up the ghost for 2 weeks, feeling like it had a stress fracture, but no feeling as to when it could have happened. I wear good shoes, and only cruise along at 9.30 sort of pace, so I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on the mysterious appearance of the ' stress fracture '. I am starting back, and have decided to use the local park for some of my running, as its grass, but a tad boring as its only a half mile curcuit, does anyone have any thoughts about top end shoes? Would a pair of say, Asics Nimbus help, despite already using quality, mid range shoes? I am steady in my determination to return to racing at a good level, would just appreciate any feedback if anyone has any good tips or experiences to share. Thanks.
 

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I would suggest an osteopath with a sports orientation. Can help with overall aches and pains and your body's ability to deal with physical demands.
 

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To save a list of which profession to go with it's easier to say any of the physical health professions should be able to help. If they specialise in sport (even better running) then they will be able to help more. The main ones are Physio, podiatrist, osteopath, chiropractor.

Buying expensive shoes doesn't make any difference to injury prevention. The main thing is they fit properly and you find them comfortable.

Stress fractures are always caused by running too many miles and not allowing enough time for recovery. I think current theory is that the pace of the miles doesn't matter, it's the volume of miles that causes injury. The only way to fix a stress fracture is to remove or significantly reduce the stress on the damaged bone. Which usually mean not running for about 6 weeks.

Over those 6 weeks it's good to concentrate on core and pelvic stability in order to improve posture and running technique. If it's been a few years since you last ran your body will have changed (strength of muscles will have changed along with range of motion in joints and bone density) meaning the way you used to run isn't the way you need to now.

Hope that helps.
 

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I just assumed it came with age.

I ache a little every day - but I offset that against what I would face if I was inactive.

I don't sound to be in as much pain as you, but then I limit myself to 10-15 miles a week, and spend 3 days strength training with heavy weights.
 
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