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That's 4:44/mi for us of the Imperial kind. I can't manage that pace for ONE mile, let alone 26.2 in a row!

We'll have to find one of the old threads on whether breaking the 2hour barrier is possible, and when it'll happen, and see if anyone wants to revise their original thoughts ;)
 

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I reckon it'll be broken in my lifetime....I'm assuming though I'll be around for sometime yet!!
 

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Wonder if he had a Lemsip before starting out too ? :d:p

Seriously though that is some serious mad running.

I agree I think the sub-2 marathon will happen in the next 10 - 15 years with the advances in technology aided training etc, but it is still pretty mind boggling stuff.

Being a relative newbie to the running thing I can still remember that reading something like this before I saw the light would simply be a 'Oh yeah, its not that hard, don't know why they don't sprint a bit more and go under 2 hours' type thing, but now knowing exactly what it involves I can only wander in awe at how good they really are.
 

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Wonder if he had a Lemsip before starting out too ? :d:p

Seriously though that is some serious mad running.

I agree I think the sub-2 marathon will happen in the next 10 - 15 years with the advances in technology aided training etc, but it is still pretty mind boggling stuff.

Being a relative newbie to the running thing I can still remember that reading something like this before I saw the light would simply be a 'Oh yeah, its not that hard, don't know why they don't sprint a bit more and go under 2 hours' type thing, but now knowing exactly what it involves I can only wander in awe at how good they really are.
I used to be the same. I used to hate watching distance races because I thought they were running far too slowly. I would shout at the telly "come on, but some effort into it", but when I started running I realised how incredibly fast they are moving; and they make it look so effortless.
 

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I used to be the same. I used to hate watching distance races because I thought they were running far too slowly. I would shout at the telly "come on, but some effort into it", but when I started running I realised how incredibly fast they are moving; and they make it look so effortless.
Yes, it really is funny how on the tv they look to be moving a lot slower than they are - I remember being lapped in a 10k earlier in the year by a Kenyan who finished sub 30 - couldn't believe how damn fast he was going!
 

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Yes, it really is funny how on the tv they look to be moving a lot slower than they are - I remember being lapped in a 10k earlier in the year by a Kenyan who finished sub 30 - couldn't believe how damn fast he was going!
Well, them running 4:44 pace is like me going close to flat out. I could maybe hold that pace for half a mile, but not much more. It is incredibly fast.
 

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The thing is... they look slow because virtually everyone has watched an olympic 100m, 200m etc... even an Olympic 400m looks slow in comparison to the 100m! The marathon, therefore, just looks like they're jogging round (usually the fact that they look so calm and collected doesn't help, lol!).

If you want an idea of what we look like, just search youtube for some videos of local track running. Chances are you'll find some videos of local events, with people much faster than us, that look like they're almost at walking pace :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
At the Frankfurt marathon last year, the Kenyans passed on the other side of the road (the opening 5km is a loop) and it was unbelievable how fast they were going. They made it look easy. The Europeans came by a bit later and looked like they were struggling to keep up the pace.
 

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Why do the Kenyans and other African nations make such good runners? is it something to do with higher altitudes they train in?
 

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A combination of their higher altitude, and the fact that a lof of the best runners tend to have lived 10-20 miles away from where they went to school - and they ran to and from school each day because it was faster.

That gives them an unbelievable start - then as they get older they can get involved in structured programmes set up by former elite athletes - which end up being the best 'training groups' for long distance anywhere in the world
 

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I always think back to the title of a book that I really want to get hold of! 'Train Hard, Win Easy' - Toby Tanser.

Spend 5-10mins watching some vids on youtube and you'll soon see why they're better. It's a combination of things, including altitude, but ultimately it's because they train harder for longer, and have done from such an early age (without any real choice). I've no doubt genetics plays a part - but personally I believe this is through evolution of their families past generations also running a lot.
 
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