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Garmin,Garmin,Garmin,Garmin,Garmin,Garmin,Garmin,Garmin,...

Garmin didn't even have a GPS product for runners when I bought my Timex SDM.

And it really is a nice watch even without the GPS add-on.

But the GPS arm unit does eat the AAA batteries.

And I wish there was a way to download the info to the PC (without buying and carrying the extra datalogger)

And the strap is almost impossibly difficult to put back on the watch - it really is a pain to fit.

Anyone else got something other than a Garmin? Anyone carry a generic GPS rather than a run-specific one?
 

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Do we runners really need all this techno rubbish?
The answer is NO!
Just go and run as much as much as you can as often as you can.
Garmins DO NOT REPLACE TRAINING!!!!!
 

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here here steepler. the obsession with logging data is just a ploy to give you a psychological lift it may be interesting to know but it doesn't actually make you faster.

has anyone done research into how much faster you would run without a garmin on your hand?
 

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steepler said:
Do we runners really need all this techno rubbish?
The answer is NO!
Just go and run as much as much as you can as often as you can.
Garmins DO NOT REPLACE TRAINING!!!!!
I think a GPS system is a useful tool. It helps prevent over/under training as you know exactly what distances you have done. It also allows you to regulate your pace over certain distances.

Of course some people become obsessive about the stats and maybe miss the bigger picture but I wouldn't dismiss it as being of no use.
 

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steepler said:
Do we runners really need all this techno rubbish?
The answer is NO!
Just go and run as much as much as you can as often as you can.
Garmins DO NOT REPLACE TRAINING!!!!!
I've never once heard anyone say "I don't need to train today cos I've got a garmin!".

I like my running, I like gadgets, I like looking at maps, I like looking at and analysing the information that the Garmin has logged about my running.

So do we runners NEED this techno rubbish? Obviously not.......

Do we runners WANT this techno rubbish? Some do, it's a matter of choice.

Will it make you run faster? Not any faster than your potential/training/effort allows. But it can provide information to enable you to make the most of what you do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting little debate...

When I first saw the Timex GPS, I wanted it so badly. It was a gadget I just had to have.

And I think it's served me well through my marathon training at the time - it definitely helped me know exactly how long each of my runs were - I generally wore it once to measure each of my local running loops and then after that didn't use it on them again. It also added a whole heap of excitement to a skiing holiday ;-)

However, I definitely don't run with it all the time... and I've never run with it in a race. Having said that I think I might actually be able to run races faster if I did wear it... I think I could use it to achieve much better pace consistency.

As for all the logging, I'm guilty as charged - I've kept a manual run diary for a few years - and in the last 10 months I've also been logging all my training on the excellent FetchEveryone site. Don't see any harm in this myself and I do feel it provides me with a good record to look back on - which hopefully I'll be able to use and benefit from in future run seasons.
 

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I have kept a training diary for 20 years.
Interesting to look back and see what worked and what didn't.
I found that 70-80 mpw with two track/hard sessions and a hilly run worked for me.
Ran all my pbs off that.
 

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Steepler, I follow the same schedule as yourself, 60-70 miles/week two speed sessions, and a hill run. I work away from home during the week, and so train on my own most of the time. I find the Garmin great for interval training (I never train on the track), or for keeping track of the distances I'm covering in strange towns. For me the Garmin is a necessity.
 

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BoabyBoy said:
Steepler, I follow the same schedule as yourself, 60-70 miles/week two speed sessions, and a hill run. I work away from home during the week, and so train on my own most of the time. I find the Garmin great for interval training (I never train on the track), or for keeping track of the distances I'm covering in strange towns. For me the Garmin is a necessity.

I am also away from home alot too.
Interesting use for it,I had not thought off that one.I may just have to eat humble pie(yes I can!) and buy one!:rolleyes:
 

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steepler said:
I am also away from home alot too.
Interesting use for it,I had not thought off that one.I may just have to eat humble pie(yes I can!) and buy one!:rolleyes:
OK here's a third use........

Exchanging and remembering unusual routes. i.e. when you've run a strange route you have a record of it and can map this easily (Sporttracks plug in to Google Earth). You can then use a website called "Trailexchange" to post your routes (using .gpx file) on and look at other users routes in your area or if you are.

http://www.trailexchange.co.uk/
 

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Totally disagree with your review and choice. The 405 is not the best IMO. It doesn't do multisport, you can't change pace alarms on the run and reportedly the bezel has problems in the wet. Also, since I have to plug the watch in to charge it what is the point of wireless syncing. And the 305 has a better screen to view my info on.

The forerunner 50 is woefully inacurate unless you can run at exactly the same cadence throughout the run regardless of pace. I calibrated mine at 6.2 mph and if I run faster or slower or vary my stride when I am tired it measures short or long.

Also you have not reviewed the 310 which appears to offer the best of the 405 and 305 as well as being waterproof.

BTW I have the forerunner 50 and 305.
 

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I think the Garmin is the dog doh dahs, it has helped me immensely.

For training and races I run to a set heart rate rather than pace, as this varies quite a lot especially off road and up/down hill. In races it stops me going of too fast and ease into it, as I do mainly marathons and ultras going off too fast is a big no no!

For intervals I've setup different workouts on the watch so it tells me when to push it and ease off, I don't have to do it but its a great motivator. I found if I chose myself I'd end up missing some intervals towards the end when I'm tired.

The mile split beeper also reminds me to take a drink so I don't get dehydrated on the long ones.

I often run new routes in forests or trails so running with a map and compass is essential, I'll also load a few waypoints into the watch just in case I get "mislocated".

I then have hours of fun seeing where I ran with SportsTracks and Google Earth, analyse all of the data,not that I know what I'm really looking for!

Is any of this essential? NO but it makes my running much more enjoyable and that's worth £180 in my book.

I also run in the day from home as I work for myself and it helps me take that initial step out of the door.
 

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I wonder if anyone had a 305 when this discussion started? or was this back in the days of the 101/201? (was there ever a 301?)

Nothing is 'essential' in running, be it GPS, or any other type of time-piece, or even clothing if you really want to take it to the extremes!

Shoes also aren't a necessity if you're willing to put the time in to allow the body to adapt to barefoot running ;) :D
 

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I wonder if anyone had a 305 when this discussion started? or was this back in the days of the 101/201? (was there ever a 301?)

Nothing is 'essential' in running, be it GPS, or any other type of time-piece, or even clothing if you really want to take it to the extremes!

Shoes also aren't a necessity if you're willing to put the time in to allow the body to adapt to barefoot running ;) :D
I agree, with running all you need is put one foot in front of the other... quicky.
However we all buy stuff to make that simple action mean more to us, be it a paper notebook to record the miles, the view the feelings. To buying hardware to do the same. GPS that can track the miles, the elevation, heart rate, are a useful tool. use them rather than worship them.
:d
 
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