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After a bit of your experience here, my storey so far.

Back to running after a long break. I ballooned to 15.5 stone about christmas time and I felt ill, I allso in a past life swore I would never get to 100kg again. So new years resolution time.

I have had a problem with my knees over the last few years so I started my exercise but took it real slow. To start off I only ever expected to walk , my goal was to do the red course on the treadmill , this took about a month of 3 to 4 sessions a week and the weight started to fall with the help of myfitnesspal. About March time I decided that may be running was possible, 6 minuets at first then slow increases. Well its July now Im over 2 stone lighter ,running 7km on the treadmill and just over 5km outside.. I feel pretty good at the moment and have started to think about a park run soon.

All of the above has took me a bit by surprise, I understand that At the start improvement is rapid but how long can I expect to see improvements over the age of 50? If your storey is simillar to mine how long after you started running did you sit back and think that you are at the peak fitness for your age?
 

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Only 38, but when I started last year a part of me was thinking - better sooner than later and that this might be the last chance I get before age prevents me running the times I want. But a year later, and many google pages read, I am starting to realise age isnt as important as you might think, esp on longer 5k+ distances.

SusanW posted a really good thread on a similar vein:
http://www.runnersforum.co.uk/veterans/37686-need-get-harder-age.html
 

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I too am 52, and have been running on and off since my early 20's. After hitting nearly 17stone I decided to return to running.
I started again last may. Since then I have lost 4 stone and run the St Neots half last November in 1hr 54 and the St Albans in 1:57. I have entered the Bournemouth in October where I want to get under 1:50.

At our age and my standard I am convinced I can go slightly quicker
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Only 38, but when I started last year a part of me was thinking - better sooner than later and that this might be the last chance I get before age prevents me running the times I want. But a year later, and many google pages read, I am starting to realise age isnt as important as you might think, esp on longer 5k+ distances.

SusanW posted a really good thread on a similar vein:
http://www.runnersforum.co.uk/veterans/37686-need-get-harder-age.html
Thanks for the link Gary, very interesting read would love to hear the end of her storey but looks like she went innactive.

I too am 52, and have been running on and off since my early 20's. After hitting nearly 17stone I decided to return to running.
I started again last may. Since then I have lost 4 stone and run the St Neots half last November in 1hr 54 and the St Albans in 1:57. I have entered the Bournemouth in October where I want to get under 1:50.

At our age and my standard I am convinced I can go slightly quicker
4 stone thats great , I needed to loose 3 to start with and im fighting with the last stone now. Its good that after 12 months you still think you can get some improvement .
 

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After a bit of your experience here, my storey so far.

Back to running after a long break. I ballooned to 15.5 stone about christmas time and I felt ill, I allso in a past life swore I would never get to 100kg again. So new years resolution time.

I have had a problem with my knees over the last few years so I started my exercise but took it real slow. To start off I only ever expected to walk , my goal was to do the red course on the treadmill , this took about a month of 3 to 4 sessions a week and the weight started to fall with the help of myfitnesspal. About March time I decided that may be running was possible, 6 minuets at first then slow increases. Well its July now Im over 2 stone lighter ,running 7km on the treadmill and just over 5km outside.. I feel pretty good at the moment and have started to think about a park run soon.

All of the above has took me a bit by surprise, I understand that At the start improvement is rapid but how long can I expect to see improvements over the age of 50? If your storey is simillar to mine how long after you started running did you sit back and think that you are at the peak fitness for your age?

peak fitness probably declines by 1% or so a year, which is a bit depressing. On the positive side most of us are nowhere near their genetic peak fitness so pretty much everyone on this forum has an upside if they have the motivation and means to achieve it.

If you got down to a good weight and worked on your fitness and technique I guess most males would be able to get down to 20/21 minute 5ks. Some obviously quite a lot faster than that.

Often a limiter for many of us not being able to translate our current level of fitness into good times is sub optimal (poor!) form. That will be a limiter WAY before the limit of your genetic peak fitness.

specific advice for anyone over 50 is to do LOTS of weights with the sole intention to build muscle mass (as opposed to going to the gym and running on a treadmill). We are talking 2-3x per week. This will stand you in good stead in the years to come when faced with inevitable muscle atrophy...oh yes....run too !
 

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After a bit of your experience here, how long can I expect to see improvements over the age of 50?
At the beginning of my running carreer I was told that whatever age someone starts running they will go on improving for around 8 years. I began running, to loose weight and get back into shape, at the age of 54. I reached my peak at 62 and although I didn't improve after that I could still match others in my age category. I'm still running, though not racing, into my 80's. Does this answer your question?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
At the beginning of my running carreer I was told that whatever age someone starts running they will go on improving for around 8 years. I began running, to loose weight and get back into shape, at the age of 54. I reached my peak at 62 and although I didn't improve after that I could still match others in my age category. I'm still running, though not racing, into my 80's. Does this answer your question?
Yep it does :) , I was just amazed at how much improvement I had seen in such a short time. Im only nine months down the path, just started to cycle on days I dont run and it feels good. If I can look forward to eight years of very slow improvement from where I am at the moment I will be a very happy person. :d
 

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You have made my day fox.
Did you really have 8 years of continual pbs? , although I somehow think you have got one of those running genes they gave out at birth. :dd.
Seriously can I hope for improvements however small over the next few years ?
I was sort of thinking I'm just about on the hill and its now going to be hard work to stand still.

Cac :d
 

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That's pretty much my experience too. I started with a marathon at age 48 in 2005 (I think) with a 4:20. After a couple of years to get over that I started running more seriously and now after say 8 years of more serious running the marathon is 3:20 and I have still set pbs this year at age 58 but I'm beginning to suspect that's the plateau. But in terms of WAVA I still expect to see that edging up and I'm not sure that would stop, i.e., it can remain a motivator.
 

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I started running 5 years ago. and (I will be 50 in two years) although my speed and times seem to have plateaued my endurance seem to be increasing. so where as this year I cant get near my 5k pb (18;54) I am nearly a minute off that, I have been doing some big hill races and have improved my times from previous years by 3 to 5 mins. I notice a lot of the hill and fell runners are older so I think its cause they have the endurance.
 

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You have made my day fox. Did you really have 8 years of continual pbs? Cac :d
More or less. After my first 'win' (M55 in Pennine marathon) I couldn't bear to lose races and trained exceedingly hard to stay ahead of my contemporaries. Well, most of them. You get out what you put in - providing you put the right stuff in!
 

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Tipped the scales at 100 kg when I was 50, and hadn't done any kind of exercise for about 17 years.
Now 55, been mostly leisure running for 5 years now, and have recently managed 5k in under 24 minutes and 10k in under 50 minutes.
I've managed one half marathon in under 2 hours.
I've entered a couple of trail ultra marathons over the last 2 years (the thought of pounding tarmac for 4 hours doesn't interest me).
Last year had to pull up with a hamstring problem at 37 miles, and this year had horrendous cramps which repeated every 1/2 mile or so and had to pull up after 26 miles.
I'm a steady 88 kg now and am determined to intensify my training and build muscle endurance to complete the ultra I had to retire from last week.
 
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