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Hello all,

I'm a bit new around here so treat me gently...

I used to be an international athlete (not running) and fairly recently took up running to work. Although I sometimes used to run for my training, I never paid that much attention to the type of shoe I was wearing.
As soon as I started doing more miles going to work and back my shins began to hurt. "Shin splints" I thought and decided that I needed more support for my feet and so purchased a pair of Asics Gel Kayanos. They were beautiful and all my pain went away. I flew.

HOWEVER 400 miles later, I have found that they are suddenly wearing very hard on the outside of the sole, on the widest part of the foot opposite the ball.

Is it possible that i do not need that much support any more? Am I now underpronating where I used to overpronate? If so, what is a good shoe to get now? I like Asics (always found them comfortable - not too spongy). Do they make a shoe which would be good?

I'm not sure how to diagnose this - but would like to have some help before my knees and shins start aching again!

Thanks everybody

NID
 

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Hi Nid

Welcome to the forum.

Most running shoes should be changed after about 500 miles or 9 months approx.

If you can get to a specialist running shop and have a gait analysis done this will tell whether you over/under pronate or a neutral runner.

Hope this helps :d
 

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hi Nid.

There are far better qualified people on here than me,but at 400 miles it could be that you just need to replace your Asics.
 

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And they are quicker on the keyboard than me.........................:d
 

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Dave said:
And they are quicker on the keyboard than me.........................:d

LOL :d Thank you for even suggesting that I might be even remotely qualified (qualified looney)
 

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The life span of a shoe averages 4-6 hundred miles, depending on shoe, surface, miles and weight of individual. Ideally, get a second pair of like or similiar shoes about mid life and use them for your long runs and wear your older pair for shorter distances until they reach retirement. You'll save yourself from potential injury by running lond distance in a shoe that is compromised on cushioning due to wear. Get a gait assessment from a reputable shop. Sweatshop's are good. It may be that the Kayano is just posting your foot a bit too much to the outside. Take it in with you and any other shoes you've worn in the past. The staff can look at your feet, shoes, and watch you run to determine which shoe is right for you. Good luck.
 
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