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62yr old female, slim, keen hiker but not run since I was in high school. Finished C25K in July and have continued to run 2-3 times a week. Do I need to be eating protein after runs?

Additionally, just been diagnosed as prediabetic - what, me, how can that be? - so need to focus on those nasty ‘free sugars’ which, I might add, I hardly eat anyway. I’ve bought a few different versions of the commercially-produced protein bars but as they’re coming in at around 9g of sugar per bar I’d rather not eat them in my current circumstances. Assuming I do need to have a quick protein uptake after exercising what do you suggest? Anyone know of bars with less sugar?
 

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You need to take all sugar into account like bread, pasta, rice, potatoes etc

Protein powder shouldn't have much sugar in it, aim to get the stuff you mix yourself to avoid excess sugar
 

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All sugars I know but I’m trying to cut out all of the ‘unnecessary’, really blatant in your face ones in particular.

I’ll take a look at the powders your referring to.
 

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All sugars I know but I’m trying to cut out all of the ‘unnecessary’, really blatant in your face ones in particular.

I’ll take a look at the powders your referring to.
If you aren't a cook, that's ok, because it is quite easy to make your own food, and then you can control what ingredients are used: for example, reducing sugars. I like to make my own gorp. Gorp, (I'm old school and don't know what they call it now) is basically granola, nuts, raisins, cholate chips (I get less sugar 85% coca), any other dried fruit (apricots, dates, etc...), and sunflower seeds. Try it out yourself.
Tim
 

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If you aren't a cook, that's ok, because it is quite easy to make your own food, and then you can control what ingredients are used: for example, reducing sugars. I like to make my own gorp. Gorp, (I'm old school and don't know what they call it now) is basically granola, nuts, raisins, cholate chips (I get less sugar 85% coca), any other dried fruit (apricots, dates, etc...), and sunflower seeds. Try it out yourself.
Tim
I forgot to say to mix all the ingredients together in a bag, and eat it combined.
 

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Thanks for your reply.

So, would this be your post-exercise protein boost? It’s that I’m looking for.

And do I really need a protein boost if I’m running between 5-8 km 2-3 times a week?
 

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Thanks for your reply.

So, would this be your post-exercise protein boost? It’s that I’m looking for.

And do I really need a protein boost if I’m running between 5-8 km 2-3 times a week?
Prediabetes
  • Boost your intake of vegetables and fresh fruit.
  • Eat more low-fat dairy products and beans.
  • Choose whole grains more often.
  • Choose fish, poultry, and lean meat instead of fatty red meat or processed meat.
  • Reduce the amount of sweets you have.
So, it's pretty easy to see what you need to do for prediabetes, however when you mix in a hard cardio workout, then you have to try different things out to see what's right for you. Each person is different when it comes to distance and body needs. For example, I usually have a very simple small breakfast 3 hours before a marathon: small bowl of oatmeal, juice, and a bit of coffee or chocolate for caffeine. Go to the bathroom, and drink water up to 30 minutes prior. I usually don't eat much until 30 minutes post race, after my stomach has settled down. But, if you feel light headed, weak, tired, drained, then by all means try eating a protein bar or an energy gue. I would also suggest running with someone or a group of friends, and have a contingency plan if things go south.
Tim
 

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All sugars I know but I’m trying to cut out all of the ‘unnecessary’, really blatant in your face ones in particular.

I’ll take a look at the powders your referring to.
They all end up as sugar in your blood system, you need to control the whole load of them. Your body isn't tolerating sugar/carbohydrate well, not it's not tolerating haribos well!

Somebody who eats loads of haribo for example but stays at a healthy weight, excercises regularly and sticks to a normal calorie load is unlikely to get diabetes

A person who eats loads of bread, pasta, rice and is overweight and doesnt exercise is at risk of getting type 1 diabetes.

Being overweight and not exercising enough are the risk factors. Not the food we eat.

If we don't manage the carbs we eat we are likely to become overweight. It's difficult to get fat in a high protein high fat diet even.
 
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