Runners Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know it'll be difficult to say, but you guys have have done a lot of races might be able to shed some light on how much the distances might vary, eg 6m race actually being 6.5m? Different again I know on courses with hills.

Just wondered how much extra I could factor into training to make sure my times are okay.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,654 Posts
If a race entry form has something like "Certificate of Course Accuracy" on it then the distance of the race, ie 10k should be 10k.

Some races aren't 100% accurate but if they are "long" or "short" it's not normally by much.

I'd suggest trying to find out the nature of the race you intend to do and then run a training course that is as close as possible to it.

Any help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
What Steve said. A 6 mile race tends to be 6 miles there or thereabouts. Any inaccuracy isn't usually a huge deal that you have to worry about. You won't have to worry about running an extra half a mile!

The one thing you would have to factor in, which you have mentioned already, is the course itself. Courses can vary between nice flat roads and hilly multi terains. Prepare yourself for the type of course the race will be run on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,654 Posts
Terrain is the main factor...XC, trail, road, flat, undulating, hilly....and the weather on the day of course.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Aye... all has been said really... XC races tend to vary a little more... but the likelihood of a 10k race being more than 0.1miles out is pretty minute... and if the course is properly measured (usually stated as 'accurate' or 'certified' on the race description) then you've nothing to worry about.

Hills and terrain etc... that's what you wanna be concerned about ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,654 Posts
Also if you're one for popping into pubs on the way round you may have to add a bit of yardage........lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,493 Posts
Courses are generally measured by the shortest route, which in race conditions, especially if it's a big race, is not always possible to take
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
I generally find that GPS watches record slightly greater distances than the course advertises, but this is due to "extra" distance, ie overtaking people, taking the long side of a curve etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,221 Posts
I generally find that GPS watches record slightly greater distances than the course advertises, but this is due to "extra" distance, ie overtaking people, taking the long side of a curve etc.

I found this today in my 10k race - my Garmin says I ran 10.2k - at the pace I run, 200m is around another minute added to my time so those little extras could add up to a small but signficant difference to the finishing time (especially on shorter distances)

I must learn to overtake on the inside, and avoid swinging out wide :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
I wouldn't change technique or anything, just be aware that 10 "training" kms does not make a full 10k race

Frustrating for marathons, because I'm generally half a mile over distance, a pain eg when aiming for 3:30 and getting 3:30:11 :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,185 Posts
I generally find that GPS watches record slightly greater distances than the course advertises, but this is due to "extra" distance, ie overtaking people, taking the long side of a curve etc.
I ran the East End 5km in Glasgow last week, and was suprised to find it was almost 1/4 mile short, when I checked my Garmin - which was really annoying, as I ran the course slower than my last two five km's.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
Forgive me if this has already been mentioned... but at the Glooston 10k, there was an 'equivalent flat distance' of something like 6.55miles, which I'm guessing allows for the hills etc - I wonder how they worked that one out?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top