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Discussion Starter #1
From March-July I was doing like 6-10hrs per week of cycling, some of it commutes but some of it quite intense as well. I wasn't that good, but I was improving nicely. However in spite of all these hours (which would be quite a big amount if done for running) I could barely run 10min miles. Obviously this was due to lack of running, but you'd expect better with all of that cardio.

Anyway, from July-now I switched to running (initially 2hours per week, but now closer to 4), and only really use my bike for shopping now, and only at recovery intensity. As expected, I've improved loads at running. But what about cycling?

Over the past month or so I've gotten slower on my bike at the same effort, so I just assumed this was because I stopped cycling and had lost specific fitness for it. But last week I noticed my tyres were slightly soft (been lazy with maintenance) and that this could be the reason I was slowing down. I've been feeling a lot of rolling resistance lately, but I just thought that meant I had lost fitness. So yesterday I pumped them up back to as hard as they used to be.

Massive difference - I was flying!! Turns out I hadn't lost any cycling fitness after all. Actually, and ironically, it turns out my cycling fitness is better - I was going the same speed as before except my HR was slightly lower than it used to be. Everything felt easy and light! I reckon I'll be cruising around at 30km/h in the future, just off of better running fitness lol. Awesome.

Shame the carry over doesn't work the other way around...

Has anyone else experienced carryover (or lack of) from one to the other. Would be interesting to hear your experiences.
 

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Quite the opposite to be honest... converting running specific fitness to cycling is harder.
Cycling to an extent can aid help running.

What various coaches have told me anyway, and in line with my own experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quite the opposite to be honest... converting running specific fitness to cycling is harder.
Cycling to an extent can aid help running.

What various coaches have told me anyway, and in line with my own experience.
That is interesting and makes sense. IMO cycling is more about having the legs for it - there's a lot more resistance felt for the muscles at all intensity levels compared to running. It's also a specific and localised movement pattern.

That's why I don't understand how everything felt light yesterday. It's like I was already accustomed to it (stronger gears) already, just from improving my muscular endurance and threshold associated with running.

But even if I could ride a 10mile time trial at 25mph, I don't think my running would necessarily be any better than it was before. Those that I know who are cyclists are bad runners. The only exception is if they were a runner before cycling, in that case they maintain their running ability or reduce the rate they at which they lose it.
 

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When I started cycling I found running hadn't given me the legs for it. Same muscles but recruited differently. However cycling has helped my running in two ways:
1. Long duration exercise without the impact. This helped with my half marathon fitness from an energy systems perspective.
2. Cross-training. I got my half marathon running fitness up to a higher level than usual on a lower running volume.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
When I started cycling I found running hadn't given me the legs for it. Same muscles but recruited differently. However cycling has helped my running in two ways:
1. Long duration exercise without the impact. This helped with my half marathon fitness from an energy systems perspective.
2. Cross-training. I got my half marathon running fitness up to a higher level than usual on a lower running volume.
Whilst I don't think it translates to faster paces, I agree with #1. I actually feel really strong at longer runs as they simply feel like longer bike rides in terms of stress and energy requirements. I have experience of going quite hard for 2-3hrs on the bike, so doing a slow long run feels really light in comparison. I guess it helps in that regard.

I also think the fact I was riding a lot of hours per week has made running hours feel low in comparison. At least mentally if not physically.

So maybe it helps with energy systems and glycogen stores as you say. And mentally get used to going for a long time.

One thing I know for sure though is, if I do low running again and do 10 hours per week cycling, I will be back to 10min miles in no time. On the other hand, if I barely do any cycling and continue focusing/improving at running, I actually reckon I'll improve at cycling as well.
 

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I've just got myself a road bike, one reason being to help with my running. A friend in the running club, who came from a very good level cycling background, has struggled at running over the years but reckons my running fitness will make it 'easier' as a new cyclist. I'm toying with the idea of eventually having the bulk of my training from cycling because of its low impact, but running will always be my first love, just got to get the balance right I suppose :d
 

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I cycled to a friends house on my normal running route and really struggled on the hills. The way home was even worse after a bottle of red!
 

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I do about 120 km on the bike each week, sometimes more, and at most two runs. I find it means that I am never struggling for endurance or to catch my breath, but the cycling doesn't build up the right type of hardness in your legs for running, so I still need to do at least one run a week. My long runs are about 15-20 km, but I mainly do trail runs in the mountains, so it's true that I never really look at pace and I know I am pretty slow (but then, I have never tried to go fast!).
 

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At some point I heard that some fell & ultra runners liked cycling for training..... apart from the cardio & lack of impact cycling is much like ALOT of single leg squat repeats (trust me I know this from cycling up the hill back from the gym after a leg set!).... so to that extent it's good for quad strength and hence hill running.

I did a few years with ultra running in the early spring and a summer/autumn Ironman, sure my fitness was good & run specific meant a marathon was not going to be much of a problem but I really struggled to translate that run fitness onto the bike.
 

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Ive got a neglected road bike set up on a turbo in the garage, seems as soon as i feel some niggles in my legs i revert back onto the turbo, maybe venture outside if im feeling brave. Normally sorts out my legs in a few days. I definitely feel the benefits in terms of leg strength coming off the back of few days on turbo, hill sessions are much easier :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Interesting experiences.

Back when I was riding 6hrs+/week, my max aerobic speed was like 14-15mph. Now it's like 16-17mph, just off of running training!?! This week I was even faster than last. It's weird because the gears all feel light and my legs feel super fresh/strong. I guess it makes sense because my legs already have cycling stuff ingrained into them from all of those months, and I would say my legs are more suited to riding than running, so a big boost in cardio fitness from running would have that effect.

Last year when I did some running for a month or so, my aerobic pace was >10min miles. Then I did mostly cycling for months on end, but my aerobic pace was still 10min miles afterwards, if not worse. So the cycling didn't help my running speed at all, only maintained to an extent. (Without run or bike, I'd probably be like 12min miles, so there is some elementary fitness carryover I guess.)

The only thing it seemed to helped me with was being able to go for longer, a better aerobic/energy system in a general sense, and being mentally used to it, (as in a long/hard bike ride), but that didn't change the fact my pace was the same/worse!
 

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Cycling and running are vastly different. Here a few of the differences before I have to turn the veg off.

1. Cycling has limited/no impact on bones so bones lose mineral density, as impact force is needed to keep bones strong.
2. Running relies a lot on stored energy within the tendons where as cycling needs concentric muscle action.
3. Running the hips move from a flexed position to an extended position where as cycling the hip stay flexed throughout which shortens the hip flexors and reduces the strength/efficiently of the hip extensors.
4. A bike helps maintain joint stability where as running its all down to the musculoskeletal and nervous system to keep the body upright. Nearly 80% of energy used when running is for keeping the body upright
 

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Cycling and running are vastly different. Here a few of the differences before I have to turn the veg off.

1. Cycling has limited/no impact on bones so bones lose mineral density, as impact force is needed to keep bones strong.
2. Running relies a lot on stored energy within the tendons where as cycling needs concentric muscle action.
3. Running the hips move from a flexed position to an extended position where as cycling the hip stay flexed throughout which shortens the hip flexors and reduces the strength/efficiently of the hip extensors.
4. A bike helps maintain joint stability where as running its all down to the musculoskeletal and nervous system to keep the body upright. Nearly 80% of energy used when running is for keeping the body upright
So can I presume that even though one wont help the other it is still a good idea to mix the two?

I have just started to cycle again, my original intention was to try and build up to running five times a week but my body was just not able to do it . My main aim for now is weight control, I still need to loose some beef so starting to cycle enables me to burn calories while my bits recover from running. I aim to run and ride six days with one day rest.
I have found that the running seems to have made me cycle better than two years ago when I just cycled, but either way I'm loving mixing it up and I hope it will reduce running niggles over time.
 

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So can I presume that even though one wont help the other it is still a good idea to mix the two?

I have just started to cycle again, my original intention was to try and build up to running five times a week but my body was just not able to do it . My main aim for now is weight control, I still need to loose some beef so starting to cycle enables me to burn calories while my bits recover from running. I aim to run and ride six days with one day rest.
I have found that the running seems to have made me cycle better than two years ago when I just cycled, but either way I'm loving mixing it up and I hope it will reduce running niggles over time.
Mixing up training is always good as different training stresses the body in different ways. Which leads to different tissues becoming stronger. Stronger tissue = greater resistance to injury.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I think I'm gonna do one faster ride a week from now on. On the way back home etc. Usually I do all of them them at recovery intensity, but will start doing one of them at my max aerobic HR to build even more specificness. I'm excited to see how I fare next spring/summer on a tempo/threshold ride!!! I can only see myself getting even better so long as my running keeps improving.
 
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