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Hi

I use a heart rate monitor when I go to the gym and have been using it on my runs.

I am trying to lose weight mainly but obviously want to get fit at the same time.

I have been talking to someone about my heartrate and I said what my averate heart rate is and what my max is.

Average 130-140
Max 170 180

I've been told I am working to hard and that rather then being in an 'Aerobic Zone' when I workout or run I am in an 'Anaerobic Zone' and burning glycogen and not fat (which is not what I want).

Is this right. I want to get fit and lose weight at the same time.

Any help would be great

Cheers

The Minx

p.s. do you like my new avatar?? (thats what I am going to look like when I am fit and slim) I wish!!! :eek:
 

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littleminxie said:
Hi


p.s. do you like my new avatar?? (thats what I am going to look like when I am fit and slim) I wish!!! :eek:
Minxie, I'll leave others to answer your heart rate stuff, since starting running two years ago I've just tracked my average times on training runs to guage progress. But I do like your avatar -are you really planning on growing a tail !
 

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littleminxie said:
Hi

I use a heart rate monitor when I go to the gym and have been using it on my runs.

I am trying to lose weight mainly but obviously want to get fit at the same time.

I have been talking to someone about my heartrate and I said what my averate heart rate is and what my max is.

Average 130-140
Max 170 180

I've been told I am working to hard and that rather then being in an 'Aerobic Zone' when I workout or run I am in an 'Anaerobic Zone' and burning glycogen and not fat (which is not what I want).

Is this right. I want to get fit and lose weight at the same time.


Any help would be great

Cheers

The Minx

p.s. do you like my new avatar?? (thats what I am going to look like when I am fit and slim) I wish!!! :eek:
Hi LITTLE MINXIE
Think of short and fast when you think of anaerobic
Heavy weight lifting sprinting and any rapid burst of hard exercise is anaerobic.
These types of exercise cannot last long because oxygen is not used for energy and a by product lactic acid is produced
It's for this reason you should have easy sessions as well as hard

idon't know how old you are with regard to your upper and lower heart rate but the principal is the same across the age range

60-70%of your maximumheart rate is classed as light
benefits Helps in weight management,improves your basic endurance and is good for recovery exercise

feels like- Comfortable easy breathing light sweating low loading for muscles

70-80% is moderate
benefits improves aerobic fitness
feels like- good easy breathingmoderate sweating

recommended for everybody for sessions of moderate length.

80-90% maximizes perfomance capacity.

feels like-heavy breathing intense sweating and tiredness in the muscles.

recommended for fit persons and for short exercise sessions

I hope this makes it clear for you

cheriton;)


Nice avatar does it mean when you get slim and fit you're going to turn into a cartoon character? ROAD RUNNER maybe
 

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calton1954 said:
Minxie, I'll leave others to answer your heart rate stuff, since starting running two years ago I've just tracked my average times on training runs to guage progress. But I do like your avatar -are you really planning on growing a tail !
I'd have to agree with Calton here. Everyone seems to be getting hung-up on the facts and figures. Running is a basic and pure form of exercise: it doesn't need cluttering-up with HRM's and stuff. Really, it's only the running that matters.
BTW, I have actually used a HRM. I didn't see it as anything more than a gimmick, really. Just something else to note down in my diary. The novelty soon wore off, too... and when the battery packed in I just put the thing away and never used it again.
Now I'm not trying to deter people from using all of these gadgets: I'm just showing that there is another "side of the coin". I don't know; perhaps beginners see so many people using these gizmos at gyms and stuff, that they believe that this is how it must be done.
 

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pedestrian said:
I'd have to agree with Calton here. Everyone seems to be getting hung-up on the facts and figures. Running is a basic and pure form of exercise: it doesn't need cluttering-up with HRM's and stuff. Really, it's only the running that matters.
BTW, I have actually used a HRM. I didn't see it as anything more than a gimmick, really. Just something else to note down in my diary. The novelty soon wore off, too... and when the battery packed in I just put the thing away and never used it again.
Now I'm not trying to deter people from using all of these gadgets: I'm just showing that there is another "side of the coin". I don't know; perhaps beginners see so many people using these gizmos at gyms and stuff, that they believe that this is how it must be done.
I have to agree with pedestrian on this one minxie but as you asked the question i thought i'd oblige .

It's then up to you what you do with it

take it easy

:)
 

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i think they're actually a pretty good idea for beginners & perhaps improvers.

after a certain stage you get to know very well from perceived exertion how hard you're working.

but initially its easy to go off too hard/easy and end up doing a session at the wrong level, not get the benefits expected and not see the improvement you wanted.
 

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I'm a gadget guy, I like to know how far I've gone, where I've gone, how fast I'm going and what my heart rate is. True it's not all needed to be able to just get out and run, but I like to understand what my body's doing and all the science behind it.

I know it's not a tremendous feat, but allowing me to look at my training in this way I feel helps me get the best out of myself. In the 3 years I've been running now, my local half marathon time has gone from 1:40:01 at the first attempt, to 1:36:32 last year, yet this year, where I've paid most attention to all my distances, times, heart rates, paced workouts etc. I'll be expecting a finish time of around 1:25:00 in April, a fairly substantial improvement I'd say compared to the difference between years 1-2.

That's my circumstances though, and I just wanted to iterate the point that these gadgets can serve a great purpose. Yet I also have great respect for pedestrians point of view; it's pointless in just buying all these bits and bobs just because lots of runners do - if you want to get the most out of them you really need to research and understand what they do, and how you can use them to benefit your running, otherwise they are just another almost meaningless statistic to write down.
 

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I can't imagine being able to change my pace enough whilst running to be able to change my heart-rate. I do remember though from when I used to use a HRM for cycling that perceived effort often bore little resemblence to actual effort. I could ride on the flat at 60% of max and then just the smallest of inclines used to make it jump to 90%.

Not sure why I felt that was relevant.:confused:
 

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richardsimkiss said:
I'm a gadget guy, I like to know how far I've gone, where I've gone, how fast I'm going and what my heart rate is. True it's not all needed to be able to just get out and run, but I like to understand what my body's doing and all the science behind it.

I know it's not a tremendous feat, but allowing me to look at my training in this way I feel helps me get the best out of myself. In the 3 years I've been running now, my local half marathon time has gone from 1:40:01 at the first attempt, to 1:36:32 last year, yet this year, where I've paid most attention to all my distances, times, heart rates, paced workouts etc. I'll be expecting a finish time of around 1:25:00 in April, a fairly substantial improvement I'd say compared to the difference between years 1-2.

That's my circumstances though, and I just wanted to iterate the point that these gadgets can serve a great purpose. Yet I also have great respect for pedestrians point of view; it's pointless in just buying all these bits and bobs just because lots of runners do - if you want to get the most out of them you really need to research and understand what they do, and how you can use them to benefit your running, otherwise they are just another almost meaningless statistic to write down.
Would you have taken up running had there been no gadgets and gizmos and treadmills and all that other paraphernalia? :eek:

BTW Richard, I'm also a gadget kind of guy... have a house full of them:d ... but none of them are connected to the running. :rolleyes:
 

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I did take up running without all the gadget and gizmos but then you start getting curious about stats and such like, they are by no means a neccisity.

If I think my run isn't going to go well I simply don't wear it like you say ignorance is bliss... :d
 

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The gadgets etc had no effect on my desire to start running at all, I started just doing a 2 mile circuit with no consideration for time etc... then I started making a mental note of the time as I left the house and checked again when I got back, then came the stopwatch for slightly more accurate timing and it's just progressed from there! Of course at no point has my running been reliant on these bits of technical wizardry, but I feel they've helped me improve and understand what my bodies doing, and why.

Jason, I know exactly what you mean about hitting an incline and your HR shoots up. Over time I've learned to feel the difference between different exertion levels so now I can run with more consistant energy exertion rather than trying to maintain a consistant pace, which isn't really very efficient during a hilly race!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In answer to Calton1954

I would gladly grow a tail if I had the longs slim legs of that avatar...... Sadly its never going to happen as I 5ft tall so I will have to make do with what I have got.
 

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If you want to get the *most* out of your 1 or 2 hours training session, then use a heart rate monitor, learn where your body is working hardest and do it. Simple fact is these devices will make you faster and fitter in a shorter amount of time. In order to maximise your stroke volume growth, you must run intervals. Research shows that to maximise this you must run your heart to it's maximum and rest it to 120bpm. Why not spend £150 on a device which will do this for you, for years and years.

I don't *think* about using my gadget, I just slap it on, and run. When I need a reference, or I need motivating, or I think I'm going off like a jack-rabbit I check my speed, heart rate, temperature and distance and I have all the information I need.

I can't tell you the amount of times my body has said NO and my heart-rate has said YES and vice versa. I've tried following my 'feelings' in my body, and 100% of the time I followed the heart-rate I've come off better off.

Learn everything you can about training, getting fit and physiology, and use your gadget to your maximum advantage.
 

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£150 for a HRM??! :eek: I do hope you mean something along the lines of a Garmin which is more than just a HRM.

Does anyone manage to hit their max HR very often? I've only ever hit 197bpm once and that was doing the bleep test, when I do intervals or hill training I've not yet managed to go beyond 191, and usually it's more like 182 at the end of an interval. Any suggestions? :huh:
 

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I've got the Polar S625x which has the footpod for speed/distance aswell, so that's the extra cost!! Very useful.

As for maxing your heart rate, you are unlikely to do it on a logner run, much more likely during intervals or fartlek... Monday night we sprinted the last half mile or so of a fartlek session and I saw 190+ on the HRM which was great since my plodding along HR is 174 at 7.5mph.

Basically, once warm, if you are reasonably fit your muscles will not have the capacity to draw 100% from your heart, and once they are slightly tired your heart can pump all the blood required. If you're like me, you'll find your heart rate settles at 182, your breathing is mammoth and your legs feel like 100tonnes!!

Must attempt max HR *after* good warmup, and *before* legs/breathing dies.
 

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My previous post was referring to what feel like maximal effort intervals though :( my long run HR tends to be around 150bpm which I'd have thought was normal for a long run - 174bpm for me I think would be 10k(ish) race pace. I've not hit my max HR for so long that I'm beginning to question if it still exists at that level :huh:

Sorry for hijacking the thread btw littleminxie :embarrassed: *awaits virtual slap*
 

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Yeah, they *feel* like maximal effort, and probably are for your legs - that's what I meant. Your heart has doubled (say) in performance, and your legs have only improved by 25% (say). Therefore you won't max your heart as easily. It takes much more work to improve the limbs than the heart/circulatory system.
 

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Your max heart rate won't change with fitness, it's fixed. Hard to believe, I know, but it only reduces with age. The best thing to do is become awfully unfit and then run an interval, you'll see your max heart rate then!

Your heart stroke volume increases and reduces with fitness, so when it reduces (unfitness) your heart has to try it's hardest relative to your leg speed thus you see it.

Best to work on leg circulatory fitness, and capilarisation (increase in blood supply to muscles) to work the heart harder.

It's the dimishing return whereby you get a quick improvement, then as your heart/lungs/circulation improves you actually encounter injury in the limbs which puts your training on hold until repaired, by which time you've lost some of the heart/lungs fitness improvement.

Get the legs built up for stamina until you're running further and starting to stretch your heart again. That's where I am now too, low HR, high leg ache
 
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