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Hi all, I've just started a walk to run schedule this week, having never done any running before. I really like the idea of the freedom of running, just chucking on my trainers and going out when it suits me, rather than sticking to what the local leisure centre has to offer. I've got a question though, towards the end of my second outing, I had what feels like a slight popping sensation at the back of my knee. Can anyone shed any light on what this might be? Also, is it usual to feel absolutely knackered towards the end!! Thanks!!:eek:
 

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Well done on starting running.
As a beginner, you shouldn;t feel knackered after a run - but that depends on your definition of knackered. Slightly out of breath for a couple of minutes is fine. Not being able to talk for 10 minutes is not fine. If you feel knackered, I suspect you are doing what most people do when they start running, and that is going too fast. You should be able to hold a conversation when running. Not just utter half-sentences, but have a normal conversation. If you can't, then you're running too fast. It will feel slow to start with, barely faster than walking, but stick with it.
On the knee popping thing, it could be a number of things. Before you start running, it is a good idea to have a GP with some sports medicine knowledge check you out and give you the all clear. Assuming there is no contra-indication to you running (and very few people have) then injury prevention comes pretty high on the list of runners' priorities. Tools for this are :
- running shoes fitted to your gait
- rest days
- easy days after hard days
- running on soft surfaces as well as road
- stretching
- listening to your body - if something hurts when you start a run and it still hurts after 5-10 minutes of gentle running, stop, go home, put ice on it and see how it evolves. Don't run on it until the pain has gone or you've seen a physio and got the all clear.

Hope this helps, enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Greg, that was really helpful. I went out last night and ran at a slower pace, it was much easier, I wasn't as breathless and by the time I'd finished my stretches I was back to normal. I almost enjoyed it!! Didn't have the popping this time either, probably as a result of going more gently, or maybe because I was running on grass and a dirt track rather than pavement and grass. Another question, should I do a bit of a warmup before going into it? At the moment I just do a couple of minutes fast walking.
 

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I don't think you need to do any more than a couple minutes fast walk/very slow jog to warm up.
Well done on "nearly" enjoying your last run. The key to sticking to it is to enjoy it : let's face it, if you run eyeballs out every time, you won't enjoy it, and after a few weeks decide this is not for you. Given a choice, no-one carries on doing stuff they don't enjoy. So take it slow, look at the scenery, and forget your watch.
I don't know what your own goals are, but I started running in order to run a marathon. I spent the first 3 months focusing solely on time on my feet rather than speed/distance. It is only once I could comfortably run for 2 hours that I started to inject some speedwork into my training. I suggest (once again not knowing what your goals are) that you should not even think about speed until you can run comfortably for 30 minutes+. One way to achieve this is to get a heart rate monitor and keep your heart rate below 75% max HR.

Hope this helps, enjoy your running.

Oh, and with regard to your knee, make sure you stretch every major muscle group after every run (calves, lower calves, quads, hamstrings, glutes/piriformis).
 

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Well done!
The hardest thing for us newbies to do is to go slow and to take it easy.
I started on a programme that I stuck to religiously. It lasted for 3 weeks and by the end I was running 5minutes and walking for 1 for 30 minutes.
I progressed onto another programme that was meant to build up the total time of the run to an hour. But I was getting bored with the run/ walk format so I started doing longer runs and shorter walks until I was able to run for 30 minutes non-stop. It took me about 2 months to get to that stage.
You must resist the temptation to do more than you should and us noobs are easily lured into ramping up the mileage too quickly.
RESIST and REST frequently.
You body needs to be conditioned to running and this doesnt happen quickly.
Run with other people of your own standard so you dont get tempted to do too much.
The most important thing to remember is that you are already doing more than 95% of the population :d
 

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Congrats Lollipop! You've taken the hardest step - starting! I only started running myself in Jan this year (the only new year's resolution I've kept!) and remember the agony of forcing myself to make it all the way around the common... and the aches and pains!

I think Greg's advice is spot-on, particularly about getting good running shoes fitted. It made a world of difference to me.

I'm now up to about 15 miles a week and try a long run of 6-8 miles once a week - I'm tracking my daily runs on www.buckeyeoutdoors.com to ramp up to the Henley Half Marathon on 8th October. You can pick different level training plans from beginner to advanced and the website will even send you an email every day with your "assignment". Today is 3 mi for me, so I'd better get after it!

Good luck and be patient!!! Regards, Drusy
 

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Feeling absolutely knackered at the end is perfectly normal Iv been running a while and I still feel fit to drop. Good luck.
 

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I generally warm up by walking for 5 mins then I stretch then I run then I have a cool down walk then I stretch again but I have dodgy biomechanics
 
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