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As the weather is getting hotter made me think about base layers. Ive always worn one until yesterdays run where i just had a T shirt on just felt strange.

So do you wear one in the summer time ? Do they help to keep you cool ?

Or What do you wear
 

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Base layers are to keep you warm so it doesn't make sense to wear it in the summer, just get used to a vest or t shirt. Always better to run in loose fitted clothing when possible. You just need to get used to it. Nice avatar :lol:
 

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Base layers are meant to keep you warn in winter, but there are specially designed ones for summer which dissipate the heat equally across your body and stop the sweat pooling.

However, I don't wear base layers when it's warm sooo..
 

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Base layers are meant to keep you warn in winter, but there are specially designed ones for summer which dissipate the heat equally across your body and stop the sweat pooling.

However, I don't wear base layers when it's warm sooo..
So that base layer claims to solve a problem where there wouldn't be a problem if a base layer was not worn :lol:
 

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So that base layer claims to solve a problem where there wouldn't be a problem if a base layer was not worn :lol:
I know, go figure! They've got to do their best to sell them all year round I suppose...
 

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I know, go figure! They've got to do their best to sell them all year round I suppose...
Yep you're right, they're not gonna say "nah don't bother with this in summer, you just need a cheap vest" :lol:

Think about it, two things you want when running...

1. To be cool
2. To keep sweating to a minimum

A base layer provides the exact opposite
 

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Am I the only one that gets frozen to the core when wearing thermal base layers (or any wicking material)?

We do a lot of running and hiking in the mountains with our dogs - really spectacular locations. We take the camera's with us so often we'll run or hike carrying a load and get very hot and sweaty. Then we'll stop - sometimes for an hour or two to take photos. Wicking material seems to wick heat away from your body too!!

I've also noticed this when running perhaps an hours drive from home - when I get home i'm absolutely frozen. The minute I take the thermal base layer (or wicking clothing) off I'm fine.

I mean, why call it thermal when it actually cools you down when wet?

We climbed the Cobbler (Arrochar Alps, Scotland) at night time the other day to photograph the sunrise from it's summit. Very warm during the climb up, but the summit was probably around -7 degrees. We were frozen to the core. Hubby stripped off his base layer and was OK - I wasn't brave enough. Just added loads of layers but it didn't help.

So any tips on what to wear to keep you warm in places like this:

 

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Common sense would suggest that wearing more = hotter and more sweat.

If it's warm enough I just wear a t shirt. If it's a beach run I'll be topless :p. As with football, I wear a compression baselayer when it's cold, it would make no sense to wear it in summer pre season, for example.

PS: Susan, that picture is awesome.
 

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My dogs wear cooling coats in the winter and that makes a huge difference - keeps them very cool. That works through evaporation. As dogs don't sweat you soak this special coat in water and pop it on them. The heat of their body causes the water to evaporate thus dissipating heat from their body.

Wearing a wet vest would cool you quicker (unless it was very humid) as the more water on your body the more heat can be dissipated through evaporation.

But what is the effect of water being wicked away from your body? You would have thought it would prevent cooling as the less water on your skin the less evaporation. But in my experience of winter wicking clothing it really does seem to wick heat away once it's wet and you're no longer running and generating heat??

I'm a bit confused by it all to be honest. It's tough finding clothing that keeps you at the right temperature when you're combining walking, running and plain old standing about!

(Thanks Goat1)
 
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