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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know any good websites showing how to setup tri-bars (aerobars) on your bike.. I have always ridden road racing bikes but I have recently bought a very cheap Tri bike just to see if it works for me, but I am finding the Tri bars a little uncomfortable and need some pointers on how to set them up, I have tried different settings but none of which feel good. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Roland. I did find this video one of the useful ones, but I think I have watched every youtube video on bike set up. But they all say different things and quite a lot are for race bikes which are very different to a tri-bike for example seat forward/back position. your knee on a tri bike falls a lot further back behind the b/b than on a road racer. It is very confusing. I found it really easy to set up my road bikes..
 

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What bike is it just out of interest? I would love a tri specific bike in the future, may have to settle for tri bars on my road bike for a while though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What bike is it just out of interest? I would love a tri specific bike in the future, may have to settle for tri bars on my road bike for a while though.
Hi Tommy.. I just bought a very cheap Tri bike from sportsdirect.com..It was only £250 reduced from £500.. So I couldn't go wrong for the price, if I don't like the way it feels then it's not much of a loss, and I can sell it and get myself another road racer.. Here is a link to the very bike..

http://www.sportsdirect.com/everlast-triathlon-bike-933098
 

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Typically tri bikes have a steeper angle at the seat post which allows you to be more forward on the bars, that link looks very much like a road frame with bull horns & tri bars on.

Not necessarily a problem.

Some only vaguely qualified generic thoughts follow... as usual, no one size fits all solution.

I'd suggest initially to set it up as a road bike in terms of saddle height (leg not quite locked out at the bottom of stroke / straight when you put your heel on the pedal at bottom of stroke) & position (pedals horizontal with a vertical line passing through the pedal spindle and front of knee).
From there it is a matter of rotating that position around the bottom bracket to shift more of your weight onto the pads of the tri bars.... ideally with ~90degrees between chest & upper arms & ~90degree bend at the elbow.. resting on the tri bars should be literally that... resting, not having to support your torso from the hips.

Obviously there are many factors of how low you want to go at the front and how long the reach is from saddle to bars..... but rotating around the bottom bracket usually means moving the saddle forward and down to get the back flatter & arms resting on the tri bars.
 

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But always make sure it is comfortable enough to be able to maintain for long periods.
no point having a super aero position if you can't maintain it for long enough to get the benefits throughout a race.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Ed I have managed to get my seat height sorted and when checking it with the 889 formula it was spot on.. I have re-adjusted my tribars and moved the seat more forward, I'm just about to go for a 5 mile ride to see how it feels.. I will post what it felt like on here later.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
HI Gareth.. I am not a member of a Tri club.. I am only slowly getting back into Tri training after many years out due to a motorcycle crash.. I haven't even got back into swimming yet. Lol ..I am having to take everything really slow as I am prone to injury really easy nowadays.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well just done a 6 mile run on the bike and it feels great.. Need to find some quieter roads so I can stay down on the Tri bars for a while, but it felt good.. Thanks everyone for your comments and support.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hopefully it works out for you! :D
Thanks Gareth.. Already enjoying this bike more than my last one which was a hybrid.. I spent a fortune on that bike trying to make it feel like the road bike I had before it..

Here is a photo of it just before I sold it.. zx. (64).jpg
 

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Typically tri bikes have a steeper angle at the seat post which allows you to be more forward on the bars, that link looks very much like a road frame with bull horns & tri bars on.

Not necessarily a problem.

Some only vaguely qualified generic thoughts follow... as usual, no one size fits all solution.

I'd suggest initially to set it up as a road bike in terms of saddle height (leg not quite locked out at the bottom of stroke / straight when you put your heel on the pedal at bottom of stroke) & position (pedals horizontal with a vertical line passing through the pedal spindle and front of knee).
From there it is a matter of rotating that position around the bottom bracket to shift more of your weight onto the pads of the tri bars.... ideally with ~90degrees between chest & upper arms & ~90degree bend at the elbow.. resting on the tri bars should be literally that... resting, not having to support your torso from the hips.

Obviously there are many factors of how low you want to go at the front and how long the reach is from saddle to bars..... but rotating around the bottom bracket usually means moving the saddle forward and down to get the back flatter & arms resting on the tri bars.
yep +1

with the seat height it needs to be between 105% and 107% of your inside leg measurement to MINIMISE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION.

you need to fiddle with the spacers on the steering column to get the normal handlebars as low as possible. Then put your aero bars in as low a position as possible. these adjustments may not be possible on some bikes.

Then the 90 degree thing mentioned above is as good a guide as any. If the pads are too far forwards or back then it will hurt eventually.

Ideally you want your back horizontal. But you will find that you are mortal rather than Mr Wiggins and unable to do that.!!. So as comfortably low as possible.

remember that you need to train in this position so as others say above comfort is important. You've got to be able to do AT LEAST an hour in that position for either training rides or your race.

stretching and flexibility over a 10 week period can enable you to get a better position so review it. The flatter your back the faster you will go if comfortable.

If like the above picture you have the steering column height the same height as the saddle then how are you going to reduce the frontal area you present to the air you are going through? Sure you will on the drops a bit but if you had a smaller frame then you would put the seat up higher and your hands would be lower.

then again I'm not an expert on bike fits by a LONG way. then again it's expensive to do it properly. And, unfortunately, it does make quite a difference...even to us mere mortals
 
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