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Just wondering if there are any vegans out there running, and what they would reccommend I do about protein for muscle development.

I have been vegan for two years and although I worked in a physical job for half of that, I didn't feel that my diet didn't meet my requirements. Since becoming more active, taking up running and a few other things, I'm a bit concerned that I wont be providing myself with enough (or the right type) of proteins.

Any ideas?
 

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I go through periods of being vegan and veganish, just occasionally relapse with the odd bit of cheese.

Tofu is a big staple for me (15g protein per 100g, compared to 22g per 100 in sirloin steak - not bad!), I also like nuts (not roasted peanuts mind!) which are chock full of protein and other good stuff. I like the nutty 9 bars which has a mix of nuts covered in carob chocolatey stuff.

Chickpeas, and beans of various kinds also have protein. I like to eat humus on toast as me pre-run breakfast sometimes ;)
 

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roadrunnerrob said:
I like to eat humus on toast as me pre-run breakfast sometimes ;)
That sounds pretty tasty! :cool: Might have to try that!
 

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This thread is intresting as I am a veggie and was wondering if I got enough protien in my diet now I'm traning for a marathon.
I mostly have a musil with added nuts and skimmed milk, cheese sandwich and yoghurt for lunch and pasta with quorn and tomato sauce for dinner is probably what I eat the most.

I dont know if I should be eating more protein?
 

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Certain nuts have lots of protein which includes a full amino profile. beans have quite a bit of protein but theres only 1 type of bean that has the full amino profile. cant remember its name.

theres soy, tofu and a range of powder supplements including brown rice protein, pea protein, organic hemp protein and soy protein.

www.myprotein.co.uk

I heard that the pea protein is horrible though.

The hemp and soy powders are the only two of them that i know of that have the full amino profile (Essential Amino Acids) which would make them the best options.
 

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If you eat a range of foods such as soy beans, lentils, nuts etc, you should get more than enough of the right spectrum of proteins.
 

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Rabbit is full of protien and they only eat vegatables.

Are you vegans out there real vegans ie no leather or animal products even in clothing and footwear??
 

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Squint said:
Rabbit is full of protien and they only eat vegatables.

Are you vegans out there real vegans ie no leather or animal products even in clothing and footwear??
Theres amino acids in veg. This is the building blocks of protein and what the human gut breaks it down into...much like it breaks down pasta into sugar (glucose)

Rabbits are herbivores, Humans are carnivorous....
 

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Scarbib_jack said:
Humans are carnivorous....
Now theres an arguement.... :eek:

http://www.tierversuchsgegner.org/wiki/index.php?title=Taxonomy


* Intestinal tract length. Carnivorous animals have intestinal tracts that are 3-6x their body length, while herbivores have intestinal tracts 10-12x their body length. Human beings have the same intestinal tract ratio as herbivores.
* Stomach acidity. Carnivores’ stomachs are 20x more acidic than the stomachs of herbivores. Human stomach acidity matches that of herbivores.
* Saliva. The saliva of carnivores is acidic. The saliva of herbivores is alkaline, which helps pre-digest plant foods. Human saliva is alkaline.
* Shape of intestines. Carnivore bowels are smooth, shaped like a pipe, so meat passes through quickly — they don’t have bumps or pockets. Herbivore bowels are bumpy and pouch-like with lots of pockets, like a windy mountain road, so plant foods pass through slowly for optimal nutrient absorption. Human bowels have the same characteristics as those of herbivores.
* Fiber. Carnivores don’t require fiber to help move food through their short and smooth digestive tracts. Herbivores require dietary fiber to move food through their long and bumpy digestive tracts, to prevent the bowels from becoming clogged with rotting food. Humans have the same requirement as herbivores.
* Cholesterol. Cholesterol is not a problem for a carnivore’s digestive system. A carnivore such as a cat can handle a high-cholesterol diet without negative health consequences. A human cannot. Humans have zero dietary need for cholesterol because our bodies manufacture all we need. Cholesterol is only found in animal foods, never in plant foods. A plant-based diet is by definition cholesterol-free.
* Claws and teeth. Carnivores have claws, sharp front teeth capable of subduing prey, and no flat molars for chewing. Herbivores have no claws or sharp front teeth capable of subduing prey, but they have flat molars for chewing. Humans have the same characteristics as herbivores.
 

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BASE813 said:
Now theres an arguement.... :eek:

http://www.tierversuchsgegner.org/wiki/index.php?title=Taxonomy

* Intestinal tract length. Carnivorous animals have intestinal tracts that are 3-6x their body length, while herbivores have intestinal tracts 10-12x their body length. Human beings have the same intestinal tract ratio as herbivores.
* Stomach acidity. Carnivores’ stomachs are 20x more acidic than the stomachs of herbivores. Human stomach acidity matches that of herbivores.
* Saliva. The saliva of carnivores is acidic. The saliva of herbivores is alkaline, which helps pre-digest plant foods. Human saliva is alkaline.
* Shape of intestines. Carnivore bowels are smooth, shaped like a pipe, so meat passes through quickly — they don’t have bumps or pockets. Herbivore bowels are bumpy and pouch-like with lots of pockets, like a windy mountain road, so plant foods pass through slowly for optimal nutrient absorption. Human bowels have the same characteristics as those of herbivores.
* Fiber. Carnivores don’t require fiber to help move food through their short and smooth digestive tracts. Herbivores require dietary fiber to move food through their long and bumpy digestive tracts, to prevent the bowels from becoming clogged with rotting food. Humans have the same requirement as herbivores.
* Cholesterol. Cholesterol is not a problem for a carnivore’s digestive system. A carnivore such as a cat can handle a high-cholesterol diet without negative health consequences. A human cannot. Humans have zero dietary need for cholesterol because our bodies manufacture all we need. Cholesterol is only found in animal foods, never in plant foods. A plant-based diet is by definition cholesterol-free.
* Claws and teeth. Carnivores have claws, sharp front teeth capable of subduing prey, and no flat molars for chewing. Herbivores have no claws or sharp front teeth capable of subduing prey, but they have flat molars for chewing. Humans have the same characteristics as herbivores.
Some interesting points there although some very flawed ones aswell.

It's maybe better to call humans Hunter/gatherers than strictly carnivorous...like a cat say. Our natural diet is based on veg, fruits, nuts ect that can be collected and eaten on top of any animal or fish that may have been hunted...or eggs gathered. This is a big difference from an animal like a cat who is a "pure" carnivore

Diet high in cholesterol is not a problem for humans although our body will produce it regardless of whether it is present in the diet yes! A diet high in good quality fresh food like eggs, and grass fed meat will provide a diet high in cholesterol. this is infact very healthy.
 

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Just to provide some balance in the argument:

From here: http://www.rense.com/general20/meant.htm

"We obviously are not carnivores, but we are equally obviously not strict vegetarians, if you carefully examine the anatomical, physiological and fossil evidence," says McArdle, executive director of the Alternatives Research and Development Foundation in Eden Prairie, Minnesota.

According to a 1999 article in the journal The Ecologist, several of our physiological features "clearly indicate a design" for eating meat, including "our stomach's production of hydrochloric acid, something not found in herbivores. Furthermore, the human pancreas manufactures a full range of digestive enzymes to handle a wide variety of foods, both animal and vegetable.

"While humans may have longer intestines than animal carnivores, they are not as long as herbivores'; nor do we possess multiple stomachs like many herbivores, nor do we chew cud," the magazine adds. "Our physiology definitely indicates a mixed feeder."


If people were designed to be strict vegetarians, McArdle expects we would have a specialized colon, specialized teeth and a stomach that doesn't have a generalized pH-all the better to handle roughage. Tom Billings, a vegetarian for three decades and site editor of BeyondVeg.com, believes humans are natural omnivores. Helping prove it, he says, is the fact that people have a low synthesis rate of the fatty acid DHA and of taurine, suggesting our early ancestors relied on animal foods to get these nutrients. Vitamin B-12, also, isn't reliably found in plants. That, Billings says, left "animal foods as the reliable source during evolution."

History argues in favor of the omnivore argument, considering that humans have eaten meat for 2.5 million years or more, according to fossil evidence. Indeed, when researchers examined the chemical makeup of the teeth of an early African hominid that lived in woodlands three million years ago, they expected to learn that our ancestor lived on fruits and leaves. "But the isotopic clues show that it ate a varied diet, including either grassland plants or animals that themselves fed on grasses," reported the journal Science in 1999.

Personally, I'm fairly firmly of the belief that the main reason humans are around today in the form we are is that we were adaptable enough to eat what we could get hold of. While anatomically we may have started out as herbivores, we've been able to adjust enough to eating meat to give us an edge over the competition. We haven't necessarily needed to evolve some of the omnivore/carnivore anatomical characteristics, either. Who needs claws and sharp teeth when you have weapons, fire for cooking, and knives to cut the meat into pieces?

But I really don't understand the viciousness of the argument that often happens between vegetarians/vegans and determined carnivores/omnivores. I'm an omnivore and I don't intend to give up meat, fish or dairy, any more than I plan to give up fruit or veg! I make an effort to ensure that the animal products I eat have been treated humanely while alive and at death, but I realise that my moral position is a little shaky. That's my business, though, in the same way that it's the business of a vegetarian or a vegan what they eat, and none of mine.


(edited to clarify which bit was quote, and which bit my own!)
 
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