Runners Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
as in a marathon type run, running all the time non stop like a pro marathon runner will run 26 odd miles but i bet someone has run 30 or more but how far exactly and how long where they running for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
hmmm so excluding multiday events then....

gucr in this country is 145miles, i had a 10minute kip this year does that disqualify me?
last years winner did 29hrs or so and barely stopped.

more normal for faster speeds are 50km & 100km events, or 6/12/24 hr races.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Let us be clear on this... you ran 145 miles and had 10 minutes kip,how the the hell does the body cope with those sorts of stressess?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
i slept well the following night ?

the race website is here:
www.gucr.co.uk
it attempts to be classified as a 'continuous' event by only allowing you to stop for a max of 40minutes at a time.

shorter faster stuff ?
draycote 35 does 35 miles round a resevoir (7ish laps), there's also a 5mile race there later in the year. the other year the winner was doing every single lap faster than my time for the 5mile race!

or there's the anglo celtic plate, kind of british championship race of 100km, winning time 7:04...
http://ultrarunner.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=120&Itemid=143
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Dean Karnazes from USA claims some pretty mind boggling stuff, one of which being 10 marathons back to back. It was a relay event, yet he entered solo. Im sure there was some writing creativity there and he walked chunks of it.. you know, these americans.

As for the UK, Mark Cockbain is well known for his stuff, he ran the Badwater Ultra- 135miles, then turned round and ran back to the start. Very few men have ever done this..

There are plenty more...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
The relay race that Dean Karnazes did was 200 miles. He actually turned around at the finish and added another marathon onto his distance, making the whole run 226.2 miles.:eek: (I do seem to remember a mention of some crawling being involved at some point. Not surprisingly).
I think he also did a marathon a day for 50 consecutive days, in 50 different American states; but obviously that's not a continuous run.

Ultra-marathons... I get. There's something appealing about the challenge of running vast distances.
... What I don't get are the events like the Badwater, the Antarctic challenge, the Sahara Marathon etc... where, even before the race begins, it's an act of survival just to be in that environment.

Running? yeah, I like the idea of that. But doing a race where the running is secondary to the act of just staying alive? No thanks.:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,962 Posts
THis is a pretty impressive one:

"The Badwater Ultramarathon begins in the blazing depths of the Badwater basin, located in Death Valley, and goes 135 miles to the trailhead at Mount Whitney, the highest mountain in the lower 48 states. Enduring temperatures in excess of 120 F, the race starts at 280 feet below sea level and ends at almost 8,700 feet above sea level. Factoring in all the descents and ascents, runners endure over 13,000 feet of total climbing. Until 1989, the race went all the way to the top of the peak. By the time the course was changed to end at the trailhead of Mount Whitney instead of the peak, only 9 runners had completed the run from the bottom to the top.

Current course record for this test of endurance running? According to the Badwater Ultramarathon website, it's 24 hours, 36 minutes, 8 seconds, set by Scott Jurek. Even more amazing? Some runners suffer this torture-fest for close to 60 hours."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
THis is a pretty impressive one:

"The Badwater Ultramarathon begins in the blazing depths of the Badwater basin, located in Death Valley, and goes 135 miles to the trailhead at Mount Whitney, the highest mountain in the lower 48 states. Enduring temperatures in excess of 120 F, the race starts at 280 feet below sea level and ends at almost 8,700 feet above sea level. Factoring in all the descents and ascents, runners endure over 13,000 feet of total climbing. Until 1989, the race went all the way to the top of the peak. By the time the course was changed to end at the trailhead of Mount Whitney instead of the peak, only 9 runners had completed the run from the bottom to the top.

Current course record for this test of endurance running? According to the Badwater Ultramarathon website, it's 24 hours, 36 minutes, 8 seconds, set by Scott Jurek. Even more amazing? Some runners suffer this torture-fest for close to 60 hours."
Yeah, the Badwater is one of the ones I was referring to when I said that the running is secondary to just staying alive.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,585 Posts
There is also a Double Deca Triathlon. Competitors complete the eqivilent of twenty ironman triathlons.

That is 76km swimming, 3600km cycling and 844km running. The winner done it in a mere 437hrs 21mins and an all important 40secs.

Fancy it Mr Team Lewis??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Hey

I just put up a new thread on this a minute ago before I saw this one.

Yep Dean Karnazes ran 262 miles non stop. He has a new interview which is on the home page of

endurancesource.com

He's a very crazy but very gifted man
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Hey

I just put up a new thread on this a minute ago before I saw this one.

Yep Dean Karnazes ran 262 miles non stop. He has a new interview which is on the home page of

endurancesource.com

He's a very crazy but very gifted man

After Karnazes ran 262 miles - Pam Reed went and ran 300 miles non stop (non-stop meaning no sleep)

Karnazes replied with 350miles non stop.

Lisa Smith BAtchen has ran over 300miles twice.

all of these runs were fairly recent.

However a much less publicised - pre internet days- run which dwarfs these is the longest ever run in one go by Yiannis Kouros - the greatest ultra runnner of all time - he ran 440miles before stopping to sleep when he smashed the record in a 6 day race - running 1000km in 6 days (or put another way 100 miles a day for 6 days) in the whole 6 days he only slept for 2.5hrs - not all at once he ran 440 miles had a half hor kip and then went for another day or so I think abot 120 miles before a longer knap - he is in another level.

his longing training sessions are only never exceed 12km
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
I'm reading born to run, I reckon the tarahumara probably "own" the record for longest and or fastest run. ;-)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top