Runners Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello to all other beginners! Isn't this forum fantastic??

I've realised in the short time I've started running again that there are about as many different motivations for running as there are runners. I'm interested in what it is that drives myself and others to go out in all weathers and pound the pavements.

For me it's wanting to get myself fit so I can take up other sports. I want to start playing tennis again and I want to learn rock climbing..it's just lucky for me that running isn't just a means to end but fantastic in itself. I've tried the gym numerous times and it just isn't me..what is your main motivation?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,223 Posts
When I started running, after years of other sports, I realised it is part of who I am... I know this sounds too vague but that's just about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,437 Posts
I think mine originally was to lose weight, but over a very short space of time I found I loved just going for a run and I needed no more motivation than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
Running helped me give up smoking in 2005 Which was a great motivation.

As much as I hate to admit it my main motivation for training as much as I do these days is probably to improve my times.

Just as a warning Runda.

I wouldn`t be putting myself through all the pain if I hadn`t found this forum when I was looking for a bit of advice about the right shoes to wear.Stupid as it might sound,that day changed my life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,640 Posts
I started running to get fitter, I didn't take in to account that I would enter races, give up smoking and almost drinking (when training shedule starts drinking is very much limited :eek: ), it has had a major effect on my life and one for the better too :d

Besides I am very fortunate to have a family of runners around me as well.

Having said that though TT has been a bit on the lazy side recently, I am rather enjoying it :embarrassed: (oh the shame I have just brought to the forum)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
I have no shame in saying I run to improve my times and become the best runner I can be. Of course the motivation comes from all the other benefits running gives me such as weight loss, better fitness, ability to do other sports, time to think & destress - generally just a better quality of life than before!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,889 Posts
I started to run to help tone my body after losing weight.

I now have competitiveititus and raceitus, thanks guys

:d :embarrassed:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I think you learn very early on not to bother telling non runners how great it is - they just don't get unless they give it a go and fall in love with it themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Absolutely agree with "the bug". I was recently struck down with something gastric and nasty, and made myself worse by starting running again too soon, becuase *gasp* I'd gone 4 days without running :rolleyes: - I'm addicted!

My motivation is to become fit and to achieve something outside of my family and career. It's something that's "just for me". I don't mean to make it sound that self indulgent, but I spose it is.

Plus, I do some of my best thinking when my feet are pounding!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,185 Posts
I originally started running as I'd set myself the target of a running a few 10k's. Fifteen months later I managed to compplete my first marathon, which definately was never a target when I started.

At the moment, my main motivation is to enjoy going out for a run and enjoy the scenery and the company of the folk at my running club. There will be plenty of time for targets/goals in the New Year!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
runda said:
I'm interested in what it is that drives myself and others to go out in all weathers and pound the pavements.
Hard to say what it was that was the initial motivation. My mother says that even when I was very young I used to run up and down the living room at home. Almost incessantly. It used to drive her bonkers!
Running is all I've ever wanted to do. It seems that many young boys want to grow up and play for whatever soccer team they support...I just wanted to run in the Olympics; (OK, may've been a little over ambitious there: but I was only about 6 or 7!).
I can remember occasions at school, sort of between the ages of 6 and 11, when I would spend entire lunch-breaks running around the perimeter of the school yard. Just for the pure joy of running. At that age I had no Idea that this was the sort of thing that people did to improve their running. I just did it!
It wasn't until after I'd joined my first athletic club, aged 11, that the motivation of improvement came to light. Even then, I suspect that the simple desire just to run,(and maybe the increased opportunity to run that club involvement introduces) may've been a significant factor.
I've realised that a major motivational element can be what you've already done yourself. Yes, that's self-motivation. With regular running you create a precedent, and with that, a desire not to slip below a previous level of performance or achievement. Basically you get to the point where you look at what you did last week and think:"...hmm, maybe I could go a bit further; or a bit faster; maybe add another run; or use a route with more hills..."
Moving to present-day (and to spare everyone the rest of my autobiography!); what motivates me the most at the moment, is the desire to cling on to what I've enjoyed in the past. It would seem that I've reached an age where it has become necessary to take a stand against the genetic urge to become a fat, bald, old (middle-aged?) man. OK, maybe there's nothing that running can do to to prevent/reverse hair-loss; or to decrease the number of candles on the birthday cake...but as for the weight-gain? I have no desire to be mistaken for an incarnation of Buddah. (apologies to any Buddhists amongst us).
But whatever it is that gets you out there...Just make sure that it gets you out there tomorrow!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
I don't really know why I started; fitness was the main aim, but now it's part of my life, I would feel incomplete if I didn't run at all.

A big motivation is to get faster, and see how far I can take this, but mostly I enjoy running and feel the benefits of it in my life :d
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
Ilsa said:
Absolutely agree with "the bug". I was recently struck down with something gastric and nasty, and made myself worse by starting running again too soon, becuase *gasp* I'd gone 4 days without running :rolleyes: - I'm addicted!
OK Ilsa, so you took a risk and went for a run when you were'nt 100%:eek: . Well done. :d How else would you have found out that it was too soon!? On other occasions, maybe it won't be too soon, and the risk pays off for you;) .
Far too many people are scared to take a risk...:eek:
...There are two camps: the camp of caution, and the camp of risk. The camp of caution is vastly over-populated. You have to queue for the showers, and there's never any hot water. The tents are pitched so close together, that when you turn over during the night you elbow someone you're not even on first-name terms with...:embarrassed:
...On the other hand, the camp of risk is a comparative paradise. Lovely hot showers that you can use to your heart's content; and enough space on the site to afford the luxury of a free choice of ground on which to pitch your marquee...with room left over for an ideal running trail...:
Keep on running!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
Katten said:
The Camp of Caution sounds a hell of a lot like Glastonbury... :d

Ha, ha, ha:d
So maybe worth a trip to the "Camp Of Risk"?
Front row seats to Led Zep(? substitute the band of your choice), with a Champagne-filled Limo and back-stage passes perhaps?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Do we get to play the board game? :p

Seriously, I think more people follow the risk strategy from not actually having a strategy and not stopping til they pick up an injury. After that they lodge themselves firmly into the Glastonbury camp. If you know what you are doing, probably taking risks and pushing yourself is the best way to become the best. If that's what you are after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
My main motivation is staying fit and keeping the weight off. I love the freedom to eat whatever I want and so on whilst staying fit and I can see similarities with what others have wrote about it being a great time to think or clear your head. I've also found it a great way to explore the area where I live. I had a funny thing happen this year when I left my car in the garage about 5 miles away for MOT and got a lift to work with a colleague. I took my running gear with me so that I could run from work to the garage to pick my car up later that day and my colleague was like 'come on, you nutcase, you can't run all that way, I'll give you a lift'! LOL. I guess some people don't get why you do it, which is why places like the forum are good. As for the racing side of things, well, I've done a couple of 10k's and a half marathon this year and I plan to do some more next year. I'm not a naturally competitive person so I find it hard to concentrate on speed continuously and I think I get more personal satisfaction from running longer distances.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,089 Posts
lol, pedestrian, you may it sound like there's no possible downside to taking a risk! I agree that without taking risks here and there you'll find it very hard to be the best you can be; perhaps if you mentioned that the camp of risk was set up next to an active Volcano ;)
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top